Effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy for smokers with histories of alcohol dependence and depression

Christi Ann Patten, John E. Martin, Mark G. Myers, Karen J. Calfas, Carl D. Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Alcohol dependence and major depression have been associated with heavy cigarette use and poor smoking-treatment outcomes. This preliminary study examined the efficacy of a mood management intervention for smoking cessation in abstinent alcoholics with a history of major depression. Method: Participants were 29 (15 female, 14 male) heavy smokers (mean cigs/day = 30.2), with an average of 6.8 years of continuous abstinence from alcohol and drugs, randomized to behavioral counseling (BC) (n = 16) or behavioral counseling + cognitive-behavioral mood management (CBT) (n = 13). A 2 X 5 repeated measures design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the interventions on smoking outcome at baseline. posttreatment and at 1-, 3- and 12-month-follow-up. Self-reported smoking status was verified with biochemical (COa) and informant report. Results: Verified self-report indicated that significantly more smokers in CBT quit by posttreatment (69.2%; 9 of 13) than in BC (31.3%; 5 of 16) (χ2 = 4.14, 1 df, p = .04). These abstinence rates remained unchanged at 1-month follow-up. At 3-month follow-up, differences in smoking abstinence rates were nonsignificant between CBT (46.2%; 6 of 13) and BC (25.0%; 4 of 16) conditions. However, at 12-month follow-up, significantly more participants in CBT were abstinent from smoking (46.2%; 6 of 13) than in BC (12.5%; 2 of 16) (χ2 = 4.07, 1 df, p = .04). Conclusions: The results suggest that interventions focused on managing negative mood may benefit these high-risk, comorbid smokers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)327-335
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Studies on Alcohol
Volume59
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 1998

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Cognitive Therapy
Alcoholism
Counseling
smoking
Smoking
alcohol
Alcohols
counseling
Depression
Tobacco Products
mood
Alcohol Abstinence
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Smoking Cessation
Alcoholics
Self Report
management
alcoholism
drug

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy for smokers with histories of alcohol dependence and depression. / Patten, Christi Ann; Martin, John E.; Myers, Mark G.; Calfas, Karen J.; Williams, Carl D.

In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Vol. 59, No. 3, 05.1998, p. 327-335.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patten, Christi Ann ; Martin, John E. ; Myers, Mark G. ; Calfas, Karen J. ; Williams, Carl D. / Effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy for smokers with histories of alcohol dependence and depression. In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol. 1998 ; Vol. 59, No. 3. pp. 327-335.
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abstract = "Objective: Alcohol dependence and major depression have been associated with heavy cigarette use and poor smoking-treatment outcomes. This preliminary study examined the efficacy of a mood management intervention for smoking cessation in abstinent alcoholics with a history of major depression. Method: Participants were 29 (15 female, 14 male) heavy smokers (mean cigs/day = 30.2), with an average of 6.8 years of continuous abstinence from alcohol and drugs, randomized to behavioral counseling (BC) (n = 16) or behavioral counseling + cognitive-behavioral mood management (CBT) (n = 13). A 2 X 5 repeated measures design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the interventions on smoking outcome at baseline. posttreatment and at 1-, 3- and 12-month-follow-up. Self-reported smoking status was verified with biochemical (COa) and informant report. Results: Verified self-report indicated that significantly more smokers in CBT quit by posttreatment (69.2{\%}; 9 of 13) than in BC (31.3{\%}; 5 of 16) (χ2 = 4.14, 1 df, p = .04). These abstinence rates remained unchanged at 1-month follow-up. At 3-month follow-up, differences in smoking abstinence rates were nonsignificant between CBT (46.2{\%}; 6 of 13) and BC (25.0{\%}; 4 of 16) conditions. However, at 12-month follow-up, significantly more participants in CBT were abstinent from smoking (46.2{\%}; 6 of 13) than in BC (12.5{\%}; 2 of 16) (χ2 = 4.07, 1 df, p = .04). Conclusions: The results suggest that interventions focused on managing negative mood may benefit these high-risk, comorbid smokers.",
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