Effectiveness of caregiver interventions on patient outcomes in adults with dementia or alzheimer’s disease: A systematic review

Joan M. Griffin, Laura A. Meis, Nancy Greer, Roderick MacDonald, Agnes Jensen, Indulis Rutks, Maureen Carlyle, Timothy J. Wilt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: We conducted a systematic review to evaluate whether caregiver-involved interventions improve patient outcomes among adults with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. Method: We identified and summarized data from randomized controlled trials enrolling adults with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease by searching MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and other sources. Patient outcomes included global quality of life, physical and cognitive functioning, depression/anxiety, symptom control and management, and health care utilization. Results: We identified 31 trials; 20 compared a caregiver intervention with usual care or usual care with promise of intervention at completion of study period. Fifteen compared one caregiver intervention with another individual or caregiver intervention (active control). Compared with usual care or active controls, caregiver-involved interventions had low to insufficient strength of evidence and did not consistently improve patient outcomes. Discussion: Evidence is insufficient to endorse use of most caregiver interventions to improve outcomes for patients with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalGerontology and Geriatric Medicine
Issue numberJanuary-December
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Caregivers
  • Dementia
  • Family
  • Patient-reported outcomes
  • Systematic review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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