EFFECTIVENESS AND OUTCOMES OF CURRENT PRACTICE IN TREATING VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY IN PATIENTS LISTED FOR LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

Amanda Chaney, Michael G. Heckman, Nancy N. Diehl, Shon Meek, Andrew P. Keaveny

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in cirrhotic patients awaiting liver transplantation (LT). Optimal vitamin D management for these patients remains undefined. We sought to determine the effectiveness of our practice in addressing vitamin D deficiency in LT patients.

METHODS: This retrospective study included 127 patients who received a first LT between July 2010 and July 2011. Outcomes measured included readmission rates, fractures, and functional status post-LT. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH D) deficiency was stratified as: mild (20-30 ng/mL), moderate (15-19.9 ng/mL), and severe (<15 ng/mL). We estimated the amount of vitamin D supplementation required for each patient.

RESULTS: At LT evaluation, 107 patients (84%) had vitamin D deficiency, and 74% remained vitamin D deficient at LT. Only 62% received vitamin D supplementation pre-LT. Moderate and severe deficiencies were less common at LT and rare 4 months post-LT. There was an association between improvement in vitamin D deficiency category at LT and increased vitamin D (>400,000 IU total) supplementation (P = .004). We found no association between vitamin D deficiency at LT and functional status, fractures, or readmissions post-LT. Patients receiving induction immunosuppressant therapy with basiliximab had a significantly greater degree of worsening in bone mineral density (BMD) post-LT.

CONCLUSION: Moderate-to-severe vitamin D deficiency was very prevalent in a cohort of patients undergoing evaluation for LT. Deficiency was improved with increased vitamin D replacement therapy. Vitamin D deficiency at LT was not associated with worse bone or functional outcomes post-LT. The influence of basiliximab on bone health post-LT requires further evaluation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)761-769
Number of pages9
JournalEndocrine practice : official journal of the American College of Endocrinology and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists
Volume21
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Vitamin D Deficiency
Liver Transplantation
Vitamin D
Bone and Bones
Immunosuppressive Agents
Bone Density
Retrospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

EFFECTIVENESS AND OUTCOMES OF CURRENT PRACTICE IN TREATING VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY IN PATIENTS LISTED FOR LIVER TRANSPLANTATION. / Chaney, Amanda; Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Meek, Shon; Keaveny, Andrew P.

In: Endocrine practice : official journal of the American College of Endocrinology and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, Vol. 21, No. 7, 01.07.2015, p. 761-769.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in cirrhotic patients awaiting liver transplantation (LT). Optimal vitamin D management for these patients remains undefined. We sought to determine the effectiveness of our practice in addressing vitamin D deficiency in LT patients.METHODS: This retrospective study included 127 patients who received a first LT between July 2010 and July 2011. Outcomes measured included readmission rates, fractures, and functional status post-LT. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH D) deficiency was stratified as: mild (20-30 ng/mL), moderate (15-19.9 ng/mL), and severe (<15 ng/mL). We estimated the amount of vitamin D supplementation required for each patient.RESULTS: At LT evaluation, 107 patients (84{\%}) had vitamin D deficiency, and 74{\%} remained vitamin D deficient at LT. Only 62{\%} received vitamin D supplementation pre-LT. Moderate and severe deficiencies were less common at LT and rare 4 months post-LT. There was an association between improvement in vitamin D deficiency category at LT and increased vitamin D (>400,000 IU total) supplementation (P = .004). We found no association between vitamin D deficiency at LT and functional status, fractures, or readmissions post-LT. Patients receiving induction immunosuppressant therapy with basiliximab had a significantly greater degree of worsening in bone mineral density (BMD) post-LT.CONCLUSION: Moderate-to-severe vitamin D deficiency was very prevalent in a cohort of patients undergoing evaluation for LT. Deficiency was improved with increased vitamin D replacement therapy. Vitamin D deficiency at LT was not associated with worse bone or functional outcomes post-LT. The influence of basiliximab on bone health post-LT requires further evaluation.",
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N2 - OBJECTIVE: Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in cirrhotic patients awaiting liver transplantation (LT). Optimal vitamin D management for these patients remains undefined. We sought to determine the effectiveness of our practice in addressing vitamin D deficiency in LT patients.METHODS: This retrospective study included 127 patients who received a first LT between July 2010 and July 2011. Outcomes measured included readmission rates, fractures, and functional status post-LT. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH D) deficiency was stratified as: mild (20-30 ng/mL), moderate (15-19.9 ng/mL), and severe (<15 ng/mL). We estimated the amount of vitamin D supplementation required for each patient.RESULTS: At LT evaluation, 107 patients (84%) had vitamin D deficiency, and 74% remained vitamin D deficient at LT. Only 62% received vitamin D supplementation pre-LT. Moderate and severe deficiencies were less common at LT and rare 4 months post-LT. There was an association between improvement in vitamin D deficiency category at LT and increased vitamin D (>400,000 IU total) supplementation (P = .004). We found no association between vitamin D deficiency at LT and functional status, fractures, or readmissions post-LT. Patients receiving induction immunosuppressant therapy with basiliximab had a significantly greater degree of worsening in bone mineral density (BMD) post-LT.CONCLUSION: Moderate-to-severe vitamin D deficiency was very prevalent in a cohort of patients undergoing evaluation for LT. Deficiency was improved with increased vitamin D replacement therapy. Vitamin D deficiency at LT was not associated with worse bone or functional outcomes post-LT. The influence of basiliximab on bone health post-LT requires further evaluation.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in cirrhotic patients awaiting liver transplantation (LT). Optimal vitamin D management for these patients remains undefined. We sought to determine the effectiveness of our practice in addressing vitamin D deficiency in LT patients.METHODS: This retrospective study included 127 patients who received a first LT between July 2010 and July 2011. Outcomes measured included readmission rates, fractures, and functional status post-LT. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH D) deficiency was stratified as: mild (20-30 ng/mL), moderate (15-19.9 ng/mL), and severe (<15 ng/mL). We estimated the amount of vitamin D supplementation required for each patient.RESULTS: At LT evaluation, 107 patients (84%) had vitamin D deficiency, and 74% remained vitamin D deficient at LT. Only 62% received vitamin D supplementation pre-LT. Moderate and severe deficiencies were less common at LT and rare 4 months post-LT. There was an association between improvement in vitamin D deficiency category at LT and increased vitamin D (>400,000 IU total) supplementation (P = .004). We found no association between vitamin D deficiency at LT and functional status, fractures, or readmissions post-LT. Patients receiving induction immunosuppressant therapy with basiliximab had a significantly greater degree of worsening in bone mineral density (BMD) post-LT.CONCLUSION: Moderate-to-severe vitamin D deficiency was very prevalent in a cohort of patients undergoing evaluation for LT. Deficiency was improved with increased vitamin D replacement therapy. Vitamin D deficiency at LT was not associated with worse bone or functional outcomes post-LT. The influence of basiliximab on bone health post-LT requires further evaluation.

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