Effect on examination ordering by physician attitude, common knowledge, and practice behavior regarding CT radiation exposure

Jeremy F. McBride, Richard M. Wardrop, Ben E. Paxton, Jayawant Mandrekar, Joel Garland Fletcher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We surveyed ordering physician attitudes, knowledge, and behavior with regard to computed tomography (CT)-related radiation exposure at a large medical center. Methods: Sixteen questions were sent via electronic survey to 350 physicians. Results and conclusion: The ability to quickly rule in or rule out conditions effectively strongly influenced the decision to order CT (85%-99%). Fear of litigation influenced CT ordering for those with less experience [odds ratio (OR)=2.3, P<.05]. Residents and primary care physicians were less likely to discuss risks/benefits of CT with patients (P≤.03) compared to those with >5 years of experience (OR=4.0, P=04).

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical Imaging
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

Fingerprint

Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Tomography
Physicians
Odds Ratio
Aptitude
Jurisprudence
Fear
Radiation Exposure

Keywords

  • Benefit-to-risk
  • Computed X-ray tomography
  • Informed consent
  • Radiation dose
  • Radiation risk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Effect on examination ordering by physician attitude, common knowledge, and practice behavior regarding CT radiation exposure. / McBride, Jeremy F.; Wardrop, Richard M.; Paxton, Ben E.; Mandrekar, Jayawant; Fletcher, Joel Garland.

In: Clinical Imaging, Vol. 36, No. 5, 09.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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