Effect of weight gain on cardiac autonomic control during wakefulness and sleep

Taro Adachi, Fatima H. Sert-Kuniyoshi, Andrew D. Calvin, Prachi Singh, Abel Romero-Corral, Christelle Van Der Walt, Diane E. Davison, Jan Bukartyk, Tomas Konecny, Snigdha Pusalavidyasagar, Justo Sierra-Johnson, Virend Somers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obesity has been associated with increased cardiac sympathetic activation during wakefulness, but the effect on sleep-related sympathetic modulation is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of fat gain on cardiac autonomic control during wakefulness and sleep in humans. We performed a randomized, controlled study to assess the effects of fat gain on heart rate variability. We recruited 36 healthy volunteers, who were randomized to either a standardized diet to gain 4 kg over 8 weeks followed by an 8-week weight loss period (n=20) or to serve as a weight-maintainer control (n=16). An overnight polysomnogram with power spectral analysis of heart rate variability was performed at baseline, after weight gain, and after weight loss to determine the ratio of low-frequency to high-frequency power and to examine the relationship between changes in heart rate variability and changes in insulin, leptin, and adiponectin levels. Mean weight gain was 3.9 kg in the fat gain group versus 0.1 kg in the maintainer group. Low frequency/high frequency increased both during wakefulness and sleep after fat gain and returned to baseline after fat loss in the fat gain group and did not change in the control group. Insulin, leptin, and adiponectin also increased after fat gain and fell after fat loss, but no clear pattern of changes was seen that correlated consistently with changes in heart rate variability. Short-term fat gain in healthy subjects is associated with increased cardiac sympathetic activation during wakefulness and sleep, but the mechanisms remain unclear.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)723-730
Number of pages8
JournalHypertension
Volume57
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

Fingerprint

Wakefulness
Weight Gain
Sleep
Fats
Heart Rate
Adiponectin
Leptin
Weight Loss
Healthy Volunteers
Insulin
Obesity
Diet
Weights and Measures
Control Groups

Keywords

  • adiponectin
  • heart rate variability
  • insulin
  • leptin
  • obesity
  • sympathetic nerve activity
  • weight gain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Adachi, T., Sert-Kuniyoshi, F. H., Calvin, A. D., Singh, P., Romero-Corral, A., Van Der Walt, C., ... Somers, V. (2011). Effect of weight gain on cardiac autonomic control during wakefulness and sleep. Hypertension, 57(4), 723-730. https://doi.org/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.110.163147

Effect of weight gain on cardiac autonomic control during wakefulness and sleep. / Adachi, Taro; Sert-Kuniyoshi, Fatima H.; Calvin, Andrew D.; Singh, Prachi; Romero-Corral, Abel; Van Der Walt, Christelle; Davison, Diane E.; Bukartyk, Jan; Konecny, Tomas; Pusalavidyasagar, Snigdha; Sierra-Johnson, Justo; Somers, Virend.

In: Hypertension, Vol. 57, No. 4, 04.2011, p. 723-730.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Adachi, T, Sert-Kuniyoshi, FH, Calvin, AD, Singh, P, Romero-Corral, A, Van Der Walt, C, Davison, DE, Bukartyk, J, Konecny, T, Pusalavidyasagar, S, Sierra-Johnson, J & Somers, V 2011, 'Effect of weight gain on cardiac autonomic control during wakefulness and sleep', Hypertension, vol. 57, no. 4, pp. 723-730. https://doi.org/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.110.163147
Adachi T, Sert-Kuniyoshi FH, Calvin AD, Singh P, Romero-Corral A, Van Der Walt C et al. Effect of weight gain on cardiac autonomic control during wakefulness and sleep. Hypertension. 2011 Apr;57(4):723-730. https://doi.org/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.110.163147
Adachi, Taro ; Sert-Kuniyoshi, Fatima H. ; Calvin, Andrew D. ; Singh, Prachi ; Romero-Corral, Abel ; Van Der Walt, Christelle ; Davison, Diane E. ; Bukartyk, Jan ; Konecny, Tomas ; Pusalavidyasagar, Snigdha ; Sierra-Johnson, Justo ; Somers, Virend. / Effect of weight gain on cardiac autonomic control during wakefulness and sleep. In: Hypertension. 2011 ; Vol. 57, No. 4. pp. 723-730.
@article{56698b20a2ac42e084c196f820351b13,
title = "Effect of weight gain on cardiac autonomic control during wakefulness and sleep",
abstract = "Obesity has been associated with increased cardiac sympathetic activation during wakefulness, but the effect on sleep-related sympathetic modulation is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of fat gain on cardiac autonomic control during wakefulness and sleep in humans. We performed a randomized, controlled study to assess the effects of fat gain on heart rate variability. We recruited 36 healthy volunteers, who were randomized to either a standardized diet to gain 4 kg over 8 weeks followed by an 8-week weight loss period (n=20) or to serve as a weight-maintainer control (n=16). An overnight polysomnogram with power spectral analysis of heart rate variability was performed at baseline, after weight gain, and after weight loss to determine the ratio of low-frequency to high-frequency power and to examine the relationship between changes in heart rate variability and changes in insulin, leptin, and adiponectin levels. Mean weight gain was 3.9 kg in the fat gain group versus 0.1 kg in the maintainer group. Low frequency/high frequency increased both during wakefulness and sleep after fat gain and returned to baseline after fat loss in the fat gain group and did not change in the control group. Insulin, leptin, and adiponectin also increased after fat gain and fell after fat loss, but no clear pattern of changes was seen that correlated consistently with changes in heart rate variability. Short-term fat gain in healthy subjects is associated with increased cardiac sympathetic activation during wakefulness and sleep, but the mechanisms remain unclear.",
keywords = "adiponectin, heart rate variability, insulin, leptin, obesity, sympathetic nerve activity, weight gain",
author = "Taro Adachi and Sert-Kuniyoshi, {Fatima H.} and Calvin, {Andrew D.} and Prachi Singh and Abel Romero-Corral and {Van Der Walt}, Christelle and Davison, {Diane E.} and Jan Bukartyk and Tomas Konecny and Snigdha Pusalavidyasagar and Justo Sierra-Johnson and Virend Somers",
year = "2011",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.110.163147",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "57",
pages = "723--730",
journal = "Hypertension",
issn = "0194-911X",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of weight gain on cardiac autonomic control during wakefulness and sleep

AU - Adachi, Taro

AU - Sert-Kuniyoshi, Fatima H.

AU - Calvin, Andrew D.

AU - Singh, Prachi

AU - Romero-Corral, Abel

AU - Van Der Walt, Christelle

AU - Davison, Diane E.

AU - Bukartyk, Jan

AU - Konecny, Tomas

AU - Pusalavidyasagar, Snigdha

AU - Sierra-Johnson, Justo

AU - Somers, Virend

PY - 2011/4

Y1 - 2011/4

N2 - Obesity has been associated with increased cardiac sympathetic activation during wakefulness, but the effect on sleep-related sympathetic modulation is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of fat gain on cardiac autonomic control during wakefulness and sleep in humans. We performed a randomized, controlled study to assess the effects of fat gain on heart rate variability. We recruited 36 healthy volunteers, who were randomized to either a standardized diet to gain 4 kg over 8 weeks followed by an 8-week weight loss period (n=20) or to serve as a weight-maintainer control (n=16). An overnight polysomnogram with power spectral analysis of heart rate variability was performed at baseline, after weight gain, and after weight loss to determine the ratio of low-frequency to high-frequency power and to examine the relationship between changes in heart rate variability and changes in insulin, leptin, and adiponectin levels. Mean weight gain was 3.9 kg in the fat gain group versus 0.1 kg in the maintainer group. Low frequency/high frequency increased both during wakefulness and sleep after fat gain and returned to baseline after fat loss in the fat gain group and did not change in the control group. Insulin, leptin, and adiponectin also increased after fat gain and fell after fat loss, but no clear pattern of changes was seen that correlated consistently with changes in heart rate variability. Short-term fat gain in healthy subjects is associated with increased cardiac sympathetic activation during wakefulness and sleep, but the mechanisms remain unclear.

AB - Obesity has been associated with increased cardiac sympathetic activation during wakefulness, but the effect on sleep-related sympathetic modulation is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of fat gain on cardiac autonomic control during wakefulness and sleep in humans. We performed a randomized, controlled study to assess the effects of fat gain on heart rate variability. We recruited 36 healthy volunteers, who were randomized to either a standardized diet to gain 4 kg over 8 weeks followed by an 8-week weight loss period (n=20) or to serve as a weight-maintainer control (n=16). An overnight polysomnogram with power spectral analysis of heart rate variability was performed at baseline, after weight gain, and after weight loss to determine the ratio of low-frequency to high-frequency power and to examine the relationship between changes in heart rate variability and changes in insulin, leptin, and adiponectin levels. Mean weight gain was 3.9 kg in the fat gain group versus 0.1 kg in the maintainer group. Low frequency/high frequency increased both during wakefulness and sleep after fat gain and returned to baseline after fat loss in the fat gain group and did not change in the control group. Insulin, leptin, and adiponectin also increased after fat gain and fell after fat loss, but no clear pattern of changes was seen that correlated consistently with changes in heart rate variability. Short-term fat gain in healthy subjects is associated with increased cardiac sympathetic activation during wakefulness and sleep, but the mechanisms remain unclear.

KW - adiponectin

KW - heart rate variability

KW - insulin

KW - leptin

KW - obesity

KW - sympathetic nerve activity

KW - weight gain

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79953175627&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79953175627&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.110.163147

DO - 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.110.163147

M3 - Article

C2 - 21357280

AN - SCOPUS:79953175627

VL - 57

SP - 723

EP - 730

JO - Hypertension

JF - Hypertension

SN - 0194-911X

IS - 4

ER -