Effect of time of day on intraindividual variability in ambulatory blood pressure

Gary Lee Schwartz, Stephen T Turner, Jason H. Moore, Charles F. Sing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine whether intraindividual blood pressure (BP) variability, measured by noninvasive ambulatory monitoring, differs between the active (daytime) and inactive (nighttime) periods of the day. We obtained ambulatory BP recordings in 143 healthy adults (95 men, 48 women) from Rochester, Minnesota. Readings were obtained every 10 min for a 24-h period. We calculated the standard deviation of each individual's BP readings about the means for the active period and for the inactive period as measures of intraindividual BP variability. In men, mean within-individual standard deviations for both systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were significantly greater during the inactive period than during the active period (for SBP: 10.3 ± 2.1 v 11.9 ± 2.7, P < .0001; for DBP: 8.8 ± 2.0 v 9.7 ± 2.5, P = .0027). In women, the mean withinindividual standard deviation for SBP did not differ significantly between the active and inactive periods (9.7 ± 2.2 v 10.3 ± 2.4, P = 0.225) but for DBP was significantly greater during the inactive period than during the active period (8.1 ± 2.0 v 9.2 ± 2.3, P = .020). Statistically significant predictors of intraindividual BP variability included measures of age and body size, metabolic traits, neuroendocrine traits, erythrocyte cation traits, and renal function traits. This study demonstrates that intraindividual BP variability, as measured by noninvasive ambulatory monitoring, is as great or greater during the inactive period as during the active period of the day. (C) 2000 American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1203-1209
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Hypertension
Volume13
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

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Keywords

  • Ambulatory blood pressure
  • Blood pressure variability
  • Clinical studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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