Effect of peripheral arterial disease in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with intracoronary stents

Mandeep Singh, Ryan J. Lennon, Dawood Darbar, Bernard J. Gersh, David R. Holmes, Charanjit S. Rihal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To compare the short-term and long-term outcomes of patients with coronary artery disease and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) who underwent Intracoronary (IC) stent implantation during percutaneous coronary Intervention (PCI) with the outcomes of patients with isolated coronary artery disease but without PAD who underwent IC stent implantation. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed the outcomes of 7696 patients who underwent IC stent implantation during PCI at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn, between January 1996 and December 2002. Outcomes of 6299 patients (82%) with isolated coronary artery disease and without PAD who underwent IC stent implantation (group 1) were compared with outcomes of 1397 patients (18%) with coronary artery disease and PAD (group 2) who underwent PCI with IC stent implantation. RESULTS: Patients in group 2 were older (71.1±10.2 years vs 65.0±12.0 years; P<.001) and had a higher prevalence of hypertension (79% vs 61%; P<.001), diabetes mellitus (33% vs 20%; P<.001), hyperlipidemia (76% vs 70%; P<.001), and history of smoking (70% vs 63%; P<.001) compared with group 1. Prevalence of multivessel disease was higher in group 2 (79% vs 68%; P<.001). Procedural success was significantly lower in group 2 (95% vs 97%; P<.001). In-hospital complications were higher in group 2: death (3% vs 1%; P<.001), any myocardial infarction (MI) (8% vs 5%; P<.001), death/MI/coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG)/target vessel revascularization (11% vs 7%; P<.001), and blood loss requiring transfusion (11% vs 5.8%; P<.001). After. adjustment for other risk factors, the odds ratio for in-hospital death was 1.84 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-2.90; P=.009), and for death/MI/CABG/target vessel revascularization, the odds ratio was 1.25 (95% CI, 1.00-1.55; P=.048) In patients with PAD treated with IC stents. Median follow-up was 3.1 years. Six-month, 1-year, and 2-year Kaplan-Meler estimates of survival free of death/MI/CABG/target vessel revascularization were 84%, 77%, and 69%, respectively, for group 2 and ware significantly worse compared with group 1 (89%, 85%, and 80%, respectively; P<.001). This effect remained after adjustment for other risk factors (hazard ratio, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.22-1.51). CONCLUSIONS: Compared with patients who had isolated coronary artery disease but no PAD, patients with coronary artery disease and PAD had lower procedural success and higher in-hospital major cardiovascular complications, including higher blood loss requiring transfusion, after PCI with stent implantation. On follow-up, the short-term and long-term outcomes of patients with PAD were worse, with higher mortality, MI, and need for repeated target vessel revascularization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1113-1118
Number of pages6
JournalMayo Clinic proceedings
Volume79
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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