Effect of massage therapy on pain, anxiety, and tension in cardiac surgical patients: A pilot study

Susanne M. Cutshall, Laura J. Wentworth, Deborah Engen, Thoralf M. Sundt, Ryan F. Kelly, Brent A Bauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To assess the role of massage therapy in the cardiac surgery postoperative period. Specific aims included determining the difference in pain, anxiety, tension, and satisfaction scores of patients before and after massage compared with patients who received standard care. Design: A randomized controlled trial comparing outcomes before and after intervention in and across groups. Setting: Saint Marys Hospital, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Subjects: Patients undergoing cardiovascular surgical procedures (coronary artery bypass grafting and/or valvular repair or replacement) (N = 58). Interventions: Patients in the intervention group received a 20-minute session of massage therapy intervention between postoperative days 2 and 5. Patients in the control group received standard care and a 20-minute quiet time between postoperative days 2 and 5. Outcome measures: Linear Analogue Self-assessment scores for pain, anxiety, tension, and satisfaction. Results: Statistically and clinically significant decreases in pain, anxiety, and tension scores were observed for patients who received a 20-minute massage compared with those who received standard care. Patient feedback was markedly positive. Conclusions: This pilot study showed that massage can be successfully incorporated into a busy cardiac surgical practice. These results suggest that massage may be an important therapy to consider for inclusion in the management of postoperative recovery of cardiovascular surgical patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)92-95
Number of pages4
JournalComplementary Therapies in Clinical Practice
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010

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Massage
Anxiety
Pain
Cardiovascular Surgical Procedures
Patient Satisfaction
Postoperative Period
Coronary Artery Bypass
Thoracic Surgery
Randomized Controlled Trials
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Cardiac surgical procedures
  • Massage
  • Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Cite this

Effect of massage therapy on pain, anxiety, and tension in cardiac surgical patients : A pilot study. / Cutshall, Susanne M.; Wentworth, Laura J.; Engen, Deborah; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Kelly, Ryan F.; Bauer, Brent A.

In: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Vol. 16, No. 2, 05.2010, p. 92-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cutshall, Susanne M. ; Wentworth, Laura J. ; Engen, Deborah ; Sundt, Thoralf M. ; Kelly, Ryan F. ; Bauer, Brent A. / Effect of massage therapy on pain, anxiety, and tension in cardiac surgical patients : A pilot study. In: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice. 2010 ; Vol. 16, No. 2. pp. 92-95.
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