Effect of lumbrical muscle incursion within the carpal tunnel on carpal tunnel pressure: A cadaveric study

Tyson K. Cobb, Kai Nan An, William P. Cooney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lumbrical muscle incursion within the carpal tunnel has been implicated as a possible cause of carpal tunnel syndrome. During finger flexion, surgeons have observed the presence of lumbrical muscles in the carpal tunnel. However, the significance of this incursion has not been evaluated. To evaluate the effect of lumbrical muscle incursion within the carpal tunnel as a cause of carpal tunnel syndrome, carpal canal pressures were measured in cadaver hands at the level of the hamate hook for four finger positions: (1) 100% finger flexion; (2) 75% finger flexion; (3) 50% finger flexion; and (4) full extension. After measuring carpal tunnel pressures for each position, the lumbrical muscles were excised and the pressures were again recorded. A progressive increase in carpal tunnel pressure was noted for each degree of finger flexion in the group with intact lumbricals. This is in sharp contrast to a relatively stable carpal tunnel pressure during finger flexion for the group without lumbrical muscles. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant difference in carpal tunnel pressure for both variables, lumbrical muscles and finger position. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance for carpal tunnel pressures demonstrated that the effect of finger position was significant for the group with intact lumbricals but not for the group with lumbricals removed. We conclude that lumbrical muscle incursion into the carpal tunnel can result in elevation of carpal tunnel pressure in cadaver hands and could be a variable in the cause of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)186-192
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Hand Surgery
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Wrist
Fingers
Pressure
Muscles
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
Cadaver
Analysis of Variance
Hamate Bone
Hand

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Effect of lumbrical muscle incursion within the carpal tunnel on carpal tunnel pressure : A cadaveric study. / Cobb, Tyson K.; An, Kai Nan; Cooney, William P.

In: Journal of Hand Surgery, Vol. 20, No. 2, 1995, p. 186-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cobb, Tyson K. ; An, Kai Nan ; Cooney, William P. / Effect of lumbrical muscle incursion within the carpal tunnel on carpal tunnel pressure : A cadaveric study. In: Journal of Hand Surgery. 1995 ; Vol. 20, No. 2. pp. 186-192.
@article{0a1720ef0f4b40c58335cd38b41b2f2e,
title = "Effect of lumbrical muscle incursion within the carpal tunnel on carpal tunnel pressure: A cadaveric study",
abstract = "Lumbrical muscle incursion within the carpal tunnel has been implicated as a possible cause of carpal tunnel syndrome. During finger flexion, surgeons have observed the presence of lumbrical muscles in the carpal tunnel. However, the significance of this incursion has not been evaluated. To evaluate the effect of lumbrical muscle incursion within the carpal tunnel as a cause of carpal tunnel syndrome, carpal canal pressures were measured in cadaver hands at the level of the hamate hook for four finger positions: (1) 100{\%} finger flexion; (2) 75{\%} finger flexion; (3) 50{\%} finger flexion; and (4) full extension. After measuring carpal tunnel pressures for each position, the lumbrical muscles were excised and the pressures were again recorded. A progressive increase in carpal tunnel pressure was noted for each degree of finger flexion in the group with intact lumbricals. This is in sharp contrast to a relatively stable carpal tunnel pressure during finger flexion for the group without lumbrical muscles. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant difference in carpal tunnel pressure for both variables, lumbrical muscles and finger position. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance for carpal tunnel pressures demonstrated that the effect of finger position was significant for the group with intact lumbricals but not for the group with lumbricals removed. We conclude that lumbrical muscle incursion into the carpal tunnel can result in elevation of carpal tunnel pressure in cadaver hands and could be a variable in the cause of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome.",
author = "Cobb, {Tyson K.} and An, {Kai Nan} and Cooney, {William P.}",
year = "1995",
doi = "10.1016/S0363-5023(05)80005-X",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "186--192",
journal = "Journal of Hand Surgery",
issn = "0266-7681",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of lumbrical muscle incursion within the carpal tunnel on carpal tunnel pressure

T2 - A cadaveric study

AU - Cobb, Tyson K.

AU - An, Kai Nan

AU - Cooney, William P.

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - Lumbrical muscle incursion within the carpal tunnel has been implicated as a possible cause of carpal tunnel syndrome. During finger flexion, surgeons have observed the presence of lumbrical muscles in the carpal tunnel. However, the significance of this incursion has not been evaluated. To evaluate the effect of lumbrical muscle incursion within the carpal tunnel as a cause of carpal tunnel syndrome, carpal canal pressures were measured in cadaver hands at the level of the hamate hook for four finger positions: (1) 100% finger flexion; (2) 75% finger flexion; (3) 50% finger flexion; and (4) full extension. After measuring carpal tunnel pressures for each position, the lumbrical muscles were excised and the pressures were again recorded. A progressive increase in carpal tunnel pressure was noted for each degree of finger flexion in the group with intact lumbricals. This is in sharp contrast to a relatively stable carpal tunnel pressure during finger flexion for the group without lumbrical muscles. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant difference in carpal tunnel pressure for both variables, lumbrical muscles and finger position. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance for carpal tunnel pressures demonstrated that the effect of finger position was significant for the group with intact lumbricals but not for the group with lumbricals removed. We conclude that lumbrical muscle incursion into the carpal tunnel can result in elevation of carpal tunnel pressure in cadaver hands and could be a variable in the cause of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome.

AB - Lumbrical muscle incursion within the carpal tunnel has been implicated as a possible cause of carpal tunnel syndrome. During finger flexion, surgeons have observed the presence of lumbrical muscles in the carpal tunnel. However, the significance of this incursion has not been evaluated. To evaluate the effect of lumbrical muscle incursion within the carpal tunnel as a cause of carpal tunnel syndrome, carpal canal pressures were measured in cadaver hands at the level of the hamate hook for four finger positions: (1) 100% finger flexion; (2) 75% finger flexion; (3) 50% finger flexion; and (4) full extension. After measuring carpal tunnel pressures for each position, the lumbrical muscles were excised and the pressures were again recorded. A progressive increase in carpal tunnel pressure was noted for each degree of finger flexion in the group with intact lumbricals. This is in sharp contrast to a relatively stable carpal tunnel pressure during finger flexion for the group without lumbrical muscles. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant difference in carpal tunnel pressure for both variables, lumbrical muscles and finger position. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance for carpal tunnel pressures demonstrated that the effect of finger position was significant for the group with intact lumbricals but not for the group with lumbricals removed. We conclude that lumbrical muscle incursion into the carpal tunnel can result in elevation of carpal tunnel pressure in cadaver hands and could be a variable in the cause of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028946912&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028946912&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0363-5023(05)80005-X

DO - 10.1016/S0363-5023(05)80005-X

M3 - Article

C2 - 7775749

AN - SCOPUS:0028946912

VL - 20

SP - 186

EP - 192

JO - Journal of Hand Surgery

JF - Journal of Hand Surgery

SN - 0266-7681

IS - 2

ER -