Effect of intravenous insulin treatment on in vivo whole body leucine kinetics and oxygen consumption in insulin-deprived type I diabetic patients

K Sreekumaran Nair, G. Charles Ford, David Halliday

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In vivo leucine metabolism was studied after an overnight fast in nine type I diabetic patients and nine healthy control subjects using l-[1-13C] leucine as a tracer. In the insulin-deprived state, leucine flux (reflecting proteolysis), leucine oxidation, and plasma leucine concentrations were higher in the diabetic patients than in the control subjects (P < .001). In 4 of the 9 insulin-deprived diabetic patients, a four-hour intravenous insulin treatment decreased plasma glucose and leucine concentrations and leucine flux, but failed to decrease leucine oxidation. In the remaining 5 of the 9 diabetic patients, uninterrupted insulin treatment prior to the study and a seven-hour intravenous insulin treatment during the study period decreased not only the concentrations of plasma glucose and leucine and leucine flux, but also leucine oxidation (P < .01). In all 9 diabetic patients the nonoxidative portion of leucine flux (reflecting protein synthesis) decreased during insulin treatment (P < .01), but this decrease was lower than that of leucine flux (reflecting proteolysis), and therefore protein was conserved during insulin treatment. We conclude that the effect of insulin on proteolysis (reflected by leucine flux) is more rapid than its effect on leucine oxidation, but on aggressive insulin treatment accelerated leucine oxidation also was decreased in type I diabetic patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)491-495
Number of pages5
JournalMetabolism
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1987
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Oxygen Consumption
Leucine
Insulin
Therapeutics
Proteolysis
Glucose
Healthy Volunteers
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Effect of intravenous insulin treatment on in vivo whole body leucine kinetics and oxygen consumption in insulin-deprived type I diabetic patients. / Nair, K Sreekumaran; Ford, G. Charles; Halliday, David.

In: Metabolism, Vol. 36, No. 5, 1987, p. 491-495.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c3c5f6ffb39c4b3ebccd7460573ab0b7,
title = "Effect of intravenous insulin treatment on in vivo whole body leucine kinetics and oxygen consumption in insulin-deprived type I diabetic patients",
abstract = "In vivo leucine metabolism was studied after an overnight fast in nine type I diabetic patients and nine healthy control subjects using l-[1-13C] leucine as a tracer. In the insulin-deprived state, leucine flux (reflecting proteolysis), leucine oxidation, and plasma leucine concentrations were higher in the diabetic patients than in the control subjects (P < .001). In 4 of the 9 insulin-deprived diabetic patients, a four-hour intravenous insulin treatment decreased plasma glucose and leucine concentrations and leucine flux, but failed to decrease leucine oxidation. In the remaining 5 of the 9 diabetic patients, uninterrupted insulin treatment prior to the study and a seven-hour intravenous insulin treatment during the study period decreased not only the concentrations of plasma glucose and leucine and leucine flux, but also leucine oxidation (P < .01). In all 9 diabetic patients the nonoxidative portion of leucine flux (reflecting protein synthesis) decreased during insulin treatment (P < .01), but this decrease was lower than that of leucine flux (reflecting proteolysis), and therefore protein was conserved during insulin treatment. We conclude that the effect of insulin on proteolysis (reflected by leucine flux) is more rapid than its effect on leucine oxidation, but on aggressive insulin treatment accelerated leucine oxidation also was decreased in type I diabetic patients.",
author = "Nair, {K Sreekumaran} and Ford, {G. Charles} and David Halliday",
year = "1987",
doi = "10.1016/0026-0495(87)90049-7",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "36",
pages = "491--495",
journal = "Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental",
issn = "0026-0495",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of intravenous insulin treatment on in vivo whole body leucine kinetics and oxygen consumption in insulin-deprived type I diabetic patients

AU - Nair, K Sreekumaran

AU - Ford, G. Charles

AU - Halliday, David

PY - 1987

Y1 - 1987

N2 - In vivo leucine metabolism was studied after an overnight fast in nine type I diabetic patients and nine healthy control subjects using l-[1-13C] leucine as a tracer. In the insulin-deprived state, leucine flux (reflecting proteolysis), leucine oxidation, and plasma leucine concentrations were higher in the diabetic patients than in the control subjects (P < .001). In 4 of the 9 insulin-deprived diabetic patients, a four-hour intravenous insulin treatment decreased plasma glucose and leucine concentrations and leucine flux, but failed to decrease leucine oxidation. In the remaining 5 of the 9 diabetic patients, uninterrupted insulin treatment prior to the study and a seven-hour intravenous insulin treatment during the study period decreased not only the concentrations of plasma glucose and leucine and leucine flux, but also leucine oxidation (P < .01). In all 9 diabetic patients the nonoxidative portion of leucine flux (reflecting protein synthesis) decreased during insulin treatment (P < .01), but this decrease was lower than that of leucine flux (reflecting proteolysis), and therefore protein was conserved during insulin treatment. We conclude that the effect of insulin on proteolysis (reflected by leucine flux) is more rapid than its effect on leucine oxidation, but on aggressive insulin treatment accelerated leucine oxidation also was decreased in type I diabetic patients.

AB - In vivo leucine metabolism was studied after an overnight fast in nine type I diabetic patients and nine healthy control subjects using l-[1-13C] leucine as a tracer. In the insulin-deprived state, leucine flux (reflecting proteolysis), leucine oxidation, and plasma leucine concentrations were higher in the diabetic patients than in the control subjects (P < .001). In 4 of the 9 insulin-deprived diabetic patients, a four-hour intravenous insulin treatment decreased plasma glucose and leucine concentrations and leucine flux, but failed to decrease leucine oxidation. In the remaining 5 of the 9 diabetic patients, uninterrupted insulin treatment prior to the study and a seven-hour intravenous insulin treatment during the study period decreased not only the concentrations of plasma glucose and leucine and leucine flux, but also leucine oxidation (P < .01). In all 9 diabetic patients the nonoxidative portion of leucine flux (reflecting protein synthesis) decreased during insulin treatment (P < .01), but this decrease was lower than that of leucine flux (reflecting proteolysis), and therefore protein was conserved during insulin treatment. We conclude that the effect of insulin on proteolysis (reflected by leucine flux) is more rapid than its effect on leucine oxidation, but on aggressive insulin treatment accelerated leucine oxidation also was decreased in type I diabetic patients.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0023235606&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0023235606&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0026-0495(87)90049-7

DO - 10.1016/0026-0495(87)90049-7

M3 - Article

C2 - 3553851

AN - SCOPUS:0023235606

VL - 36

SP - 491

EP - 495

JO - Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental

JF - Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental

SN - 0026-0495

IS - 5

ER -