Effect of Intraduodenal Infusion of Acid on the Antropyloroduodenal Motor Unit in Human Volunteers

L. A. Houghton, D. D. Kerrigan, N. W. Read

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Intraduodenal acid has been shown to delay gastric emptying. We have investigated the effect of infusing hydrochloric acid into the duodenum on the motor activity of the gastric antrum, pylorus, and duodenum in 18 healthy volunteers. Pressures in the gastric antrum, pylorus, and duodenum and the pH in the antrum and duodenum were recorded in response to alternate duodenal infusions of normal saline and 0.1 M isotonic hydrochloric acid at constant (1 or 2 ml/min) or increasing (1, 2, 3.75, and 5 ml/min) rates. Repetitive infusions of acid (1 or 2 ml/min) were associated with 1) a decrease in antral pressure waves (p < 0.05), 2) a reduction in coordinated pressure waves involving the duodenum (p < 0.05) and replacement by random contractile activity, and 3) an increase in isolated pyloric pressure waves (IPPWs) (p < 0.05). Increasing the rate of acid infusion reduced the rate of coordinated contractions involving the antrum (r = ‐0.39; p < 0.01) and increased the rate of IPPWs (r = 0.45; p < 0.01). There were significant correlations between the percentage of time that the duodenal pH was less than 2, and both the rate of coordinated contractions involving the antrum (r = ‐0.28; p < 0.01) and the rate of IPPWs (r = 0.34; p < 0.01). These changes in antropyloroduodenal motor activity may contribute to the delay in emptying of acidic solutions from the stomach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)202-208
Number of pages7
JournalNeurogastroenterology and Motility
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • duodenum
  • gastric emptying
  • pylorus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Gastroenterology

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