Effect of gender on long-term outcome of angina pectoris and myocardial infarction/sudden unexpected death

A. Orencia, Kent R Bailey, B. P. Yawn, T. E. Kottke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

99 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. - To determine the effects of female gender on long-term survival and subsequent coronary heart disease events in a population developing first clinical manifestations of coronary artery disease. Design. - Follow-up of all Rochester, Minn, residents first diagnosed with either angina pectoris or myocardial infarction/sudden unexpected death between January 1, 1960, and December 31, 1979. Main Outcome Measures. - Patients with angina pectoris were followed up through 1982 for survival and time to initial myocardial infarction/cardiac death. Patients with myocardial infarction were followed up through 1982 for survival and time to recurrent myocardial infarction/cardiac death. Results. - Angina pectoris was the initial diagnosis for 529 women and 504 men. Myocardial infarction or sudden unexpected death was the initial diagnosis for 611 women and 997 men. The average age of patients diagnosed with angina pectoris was 67.0 years (SE, 0.5 years) for women and 60.0 years (SE, 0.5 years) for men. The average age of patients diagnosed with myocardial infarction/sudden unexpected death was 71.9 years (SE, 0.5 years) for women and 62.0 years (SE, 0.4 years) for men. Women presenting with angina pectoris survived significantly longer and had a lower incidence of subsequent myocardial infarction/cardiac death compared with men of similar age (P<.01). When rates of myocardial infarction and sudden unexpected death were combined to assess all cardiac endpoints with objective criteria ('hard' endpoints), women presenting with myocardial infarction/sudden unexpected death had survival rates and risk of subsequent myocardial infarction/coronary death that were similar to men of the same age. When survival following myocardial infarction was analyzed separately, survival also did not vary by gender. Conclusion. - In this population, women with angina pectoris as an initial diagnosis, but not those with myocardial infarction or sudden unexpected death, have longer survival and lower risk of subsequent myocardial infarction/cardiac death than do men with the same presentation and of a similar age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2392-2397
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume269
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

Fingerprint

Angina Pectoris
Sudden Death
Myocardial Infarction
Survival
Population
Coronary Disease
Coronary Artery Disease
Survival Rate
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Effect of gender on long-term outcome of angina pectoris and myocardial infarction/sudden unexpected death. / Orencia, A.; Bailey, Kent R; Yawn, B. P.; Kottke, T. E.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 269, No. 18, 1993, p. 2392-2397.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{08b8385af70f437ea7c6ca4e91c583cb,
title = "Effect of gender on long-term outcome of angina pectoris and myocardial infarction/sudden unexpected death",
abstract = "Objective. - To determine the effects of female gender on long-term survival and subsequent coronary heart disease events in a population developing first clinical manifestations of coronary artery disease. Design. - Follow-up of all Rochester, Minn, residents first diagnosed with either angina pectoris or myocardial infarction/sudden unexpected death between January 1, 1960, and December 31, 1979. Main Outcome Measures. - Patients with angina pectoris were followed up through 1982 for survival and time to initial myocardial infarction/cardiac death. Patients with myocardial infarction were followed up through 1982 for survival and time to recurrent myocardial infarction/cardiac death. Results. - Angina pectoris was the initial diagnosis for 529 women and 504 men. Myocardial infarction or sudden unexpected death was the initial diagnosis for 611 women and 997 men. The average age of patients diagnosed with angina pectoris was 67.0 years (SE, 0.5 years) for women and 60.0 years (SE, 0.5 years) for men. The average age of patients diagnosed with myocardial infarction/sudden unexpected death was 71.9 years (SE, 0.5 years) for women and 62.0 years (SE, 0.4 years) for men. Women presenting with angina pectoris survived significantly longer and had a lower incidence of subsequent myocardial infarction/cardiac death compared with men of similar age (P<.01). When rates of myocardial infarction and sudden unexpected death were combined to assess all cardiac endpoints with objective criteria ('hard' endpoints), women presenting with myocardial infarction/sudden unexpected death had survival rates and risk of subsequent myocardial infarction/coronary death that were similar to men of the same age. When survival following myocardial infarction was analyzed separately, survival also did not vary by gender. Conclusion. - In this population, women with angina pectoris as an initial diagnosis, but not those with myocardial infarction or sudden unexpected death, have longer survival and lower risk of subsequent myocardial infarction/cardiac death than do men with the same presentation and of a similar age.",
author = "A. Orencia and Bailey, {Kent R} and Yawn, {B. P.} and Kottke, {T. E.}",
year = "1993",
doi = "10.1001/jama.269.18.2392",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "269",
pages = "2392--2397",
journal = "JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association",
issn = "0002-9955",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "18",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of gender on long-term outcome of angina pectoris and myocardial infarction/sudden unexpected death

AU - Orencia, A.

AU - Bailey, Kent R

AU - Yawn, B. P.

AU - Kottke, T. E.

PY - 1993

Y1 - 1993

N2 - Objective. - To determine the effects of female gender on long-term survival and subsequent coronary heart disease events in a population developing first clinical manifestations of coronary artery disease. Design. - Follow-up of all Rochester, Minn, residents first diagnosed with either angina pectoris or myocardial infarction/sudden unexpected death between January 1, 1960, and December 31, 1979. Main Outcome Measures. - Patients with angina pectoris were followed up through 1982 for survival and time to initial myocardial infarction/cardiac death. Patients with myocardial infarction were followed up through 1982 for survival and time to recurrent myocardial infarction/cardiac death. Results. - Angina pectoris was the initial diagnosis for 529 women and 504 men. Myocardial infarction or sudden unexpected death was the initial diagnosis for 611 women and 997 men. The average age of patients diagnosed with angina pectoris was 67.0 years (SE, 0.5 years) for women and 60.0 years (SE, 0.5 years) for men. The average age of patients diagnosed with myocardial infarction/sudden unexpected death was 71.9 years (SE, 0.5 years) for women and 62.0 years (SE, 0.4 years) for men. Women presenting with angina pectoris survived significantly longer and had a lower incidence of subsequent myocardial infarction/cardiac death compared with men of similar age (P<.01). When rates of myocardial infarction and sudden unexpected death were combined to assess all cardiac endpoints with objective criteria ('hard' endpoints), women presenting with myocardial infarction/sudden unexpected death had survival rates and risk of subsequent myocardial infarction/coronary death that were similar to men of the same age. When survival following myocardial infarction was analyzed separately, survival also did not vary by gender. Conclusion. - In this population, women with angina pectoris as an initial diagnosis, but not those with myocardial infarction or sudden unexpected death, have longer survival and lower risk of subsequent myocardial infarction/cardiac death than do men with the same presentation and of a similar age.

AB - Objective. - To determine the effects of female gender on long-term survival and subsequent coronary heart disease events in a population developing first clinical manifestations of coronary artery disease. Design. - Follow-up of all Rochester, Minn, residents first diagnosed with either angina pectoris or myocardial infarction/sudden unexpected death between January 1, 1960, and December 31, 1979. Main Outcome Measures. - Patients with angina pectoris were followed up through 1982 for survival and time to initial myocardial infarction/cardiac death. Patients with myocardial infarction were followed up through 1982 for survival and time to recurrent myocardial infarction/cardiac death. Results. - Angina pectoris was the initial diagnosis for 529 women and 504 men. Myocardial infarction or sudden unexpected death was the initial diagnosis for 611 women and 997 men. The average age of patients diagnosed with angina pectoris was 67.0 years (SE, 0.5 years) for women and 60.0 years (SE, 0.5 years) for men. The average age of patients diagnosed with myocardial infarction/sudden unexpected death was 71.9 years (SE, 0.5 years) for women and 62.0 years (SE, 0.4 years) for men. Women presenting with angina pectoris survived significantly longer and had a lower incidence of subsequent myocardial infarction/cardiac death compared with men of similar age (P<.01). When rates of myocardial infarction and sudden unexpected death were combined to assess all cardiac endpoints with objective criteria ('hard' endpoints), women presenting with myocardial infarction/sudden unexpected death had survival rates and risk of subsequent myocardial infarction/coronary death that were similar to men of the same age. When survival following myocardial infarction was analyzed separately, survival also did not vary by gender. Conclusion. - In this population, women with angina pectoris as an initial diagnosis, but not those with myocardial infarction or sudden unexpected death, have longer survival and lower risk of subsequent myocardial infarction/cardiac death than do men with the same presentation and of a similar age.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027270018&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027270018&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1001/jama.269.18.2392

DO - 10.1001/jama.269.18.2392

M3 - Article

C2 - 8479065

AN - SCOPUS:0027270018

VL - 269

SP - 2392

EP - 2397

JO - JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

JF - JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

SN - 0002-9955

IS - 18

ER -