Effect of diabetes on the mortality risk of cardiogenic shock in a community-based population

James V. Tedesco, R. Scott Wright, Brent A. Williams, Stephen L. Kopecky, David L. Dvorak, Guy S. Reeder, Wayne L. Miller

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Abstract

Objective: To examine the mortality of diabetic vs nondiabetic patients with anterior myocardial infarction (AMI) among the subsets of this population who did and did not develop cardiogenic shock. Patients and Methods: The study population consisted of a consecutive series of 1263 Olmsted County, Minnesota, patients admitted to the coronary care unit at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn, between January 1, 1988, and July 31, 2000. Of these patients, 73 met the criteria for cardiogenic shock during their hospitalization. In-hospital and postadmission mortality were compared between diabetic and nondiabetic patients within the cardiogenic shock and nonshock patient groups, respectively. Results: In patients with AMI and cardiogenic shock, diabetes was associated with a trend for increased inhospital mortality (odds ratio, 2.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90-9.92; P=.08). In 73 patients with cardiogenic shock, estimated survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 25%, 17%, and 17%, respectively, for diabetic patients, and 50%, 44%, and 36%, respectively, for nondiabetic patients (P=.046). The association between diabetic patients and increased long-term mortality was stronger in patients with cardiogenic shock than in patients without cardiogenic shock (adjusted relative risk, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.11-3.90; P=.02). In diabetic patients without cardiogenic shock, estimated survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was low, at 75%, 61%, and 45%, respectively, compared with 83%, 76%, and 69%, respectively, for nondiabetic patients (adjusted relative risk, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.02-1.62; P=.03). Conclusions: The presence of diabetes as a comorbidity in patients with AMI appears to be associated with increased mortality compared with nondiabetic patients, and this relationship may be potentially magnified in patients who develop cardiogenic shock.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)561-566
Number of pages6
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume78
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1 2003

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Cardiogenic Shock
Mortality
Population
Myocardial Infarction
Confidence Intervals
Hospital Mortality
Coronary Care Units
Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Tedesco, J. V., Wright, R. S., Williams, B. A., Kopecky, S. L., Dvorak, D. L., Reeder, G. S., & Miller, W. L. (2003). Effect of diabetes on the mortality risk of cardiogenic shock in a community-based population. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 78(5), 561-566.

Effect of diabetes on the mortality risk of cardiogenic shock in a community-based population. / Tedesco, James V.; Wright, R. Scott; Williams, Brent A.; Kopecky, Stephen L.; Dvorak, David L.; Reeder, Guy S.; Miller, Wayne L.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 78, No. 5, 01.05.2003, p. 561-566.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tedesco, JV, Wright, RS, Williams, BA, Kopecky, SL, Dvorak, DL, Reeder, GS & Miller, WL 2003, 'Effect of diabetes on the mortality risk of cardiogenic shock in a community-based population', Mayo Clinic Proceedings, vol. 78, no. 5, pp. 561-566.
Tedesco JV, Wright RS, Williams BA, Kopecky SL, Dvorak DL, Reeder GS et al. Effect of diabetes on the mortality risk of cardiogenic shock in a community-based population. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2003 May 1;78(5):561-566.
Tedesco, James V. ; Wright, R. Scott ; Williams, Brent A. ; Kopecky, Stephen L. ; Dvorak, David L. ; Reeder, Guy S. ; Miller, Wayne L. / Effect of diabetes on the mortality risk of cardiogenic shock in a community-based population. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2003 ; Vol. 78, No. 5. pp. 561-566.
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abstract = "Objective: To examine the mortality of diabetic vs nondiabetic patients with anterior myocardial infarction (AMI) among the subsets of this population who did and did not develop cardiogenic shock. Patients and Methods: The study population consisted of a consecutive series of 1263 Olmsted County, Minnesota, patients admitted to the coronary care unit at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn, between January 1, 1988, and July 31, 2000. Of these patients, 73 met the criteria for cardiogenic shock during their hospitalization. In-hospital and postadmission mortality were compared between diabetic and nondiabetic patients within the cardiogenic shock and nonshock patient groups, respectively. Results: In patients with AMI and cardiogenic shock, diabetes was associated with a trend for increased inhospital mortality (odds ratio, 2.82; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 0.90-9.92; P=.08). In 73 patients with cardiogenic shock, estimated survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 25{\%}, 17{\%}, and 17{\%}, respectively, for diabetic patients, and 50{\%}, 44{\%}, and 36{\%}, respectively, for nondiabetic patients (P=.046). The association between diabetic patients and increased long-term mortality was stronger in patients with cardiogenic shock than in patients without cardiogenic shock (adjusted relative risk, 2.08; 95{\%} CI, 1.11-3.90; P=.02). In diabetic patients without cardiogenic shock, estimated survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was low, at 75{\%}, 61{\%}, and 45{\%}, respectively, compared with 83{\%}, 76{\%}, and 69{\%}, respectively, for nondiabetic patients (adjusted relative risk, 1.29; 95{\%} CI, 1.02-1.62; P=.03). Conclusions: The presence of diabetes as a comorbidity in patients with AMI appears to be associated with increased mortality compared with nondiabetic patients, and this relationship may be potentially magnified in patients who develop cardiogenic shock.",
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AU - Dvorak, David L.

AU - Reeder, Guy S.

AU - Miller, Wayne L.

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N2 - Objective: To examine the mortality of diabetic vs nondiabetic patients with anterior myocardial infarction (AMI) among the subsets of this population who did and did not develop cardiogenic shock. Patients and Methods: The study population consisted of a consecutive series of 1263 Olmsted County, Minnesota, patients admitted to the coronary care unit at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn, between January 1, 1988, and July 31, 2000. Of these patients, 73 met the criteria for cardiogenic shock during their hospitalization. In-hospital and postadmission mortality were compared between diabetic and nondiabetic patients within the cardiogenic shock and nonshock patient groups, respectively. Results: In patients with AMI and cardiogenic shock, diabetes was associated with a trend for increased inhospital mortality (odds ratio, 2.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90-9.92; P=.08). In 73 patients with cardiogenic shock, estimated survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 25%, 17%, and 17%, respectively, for diabetic patients, and 50%, 44%, and 36%, respectively, for nondiabetic patients (P=.046). The association between diabetic patients and increased long-term mortality was stronger in patients with cardiogenic shock than in patients without cardiogenic shock (adjusted relative risk, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.11-3.90; P=.02). In diabetic patients without cardiogenic shock, estimated survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was low, at 75%, 61%, and 45%, respectively, compared with 83%, 76%, and 69%, respectively, for nondiabetic patients (adjusted relative risk, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.02-1.62; P=.03). Conclusions: The presence of diabetes as a comorbidity in patients with AMI appears to be associated with increased mortality compared with nondiabetic patients, and this relationship may be potentially magnified in patients who develop cardiogenic shock.

AB - Objective: To examine the mortality of diabetic vs nondiabetic patients with anterior myocardial infarction (AMI) among the subsets of this population who did and did not develop cardiogenic shock. Patients and Methods: The study population consisted of a consecutive series of 1263 Olmsted County, Minnesota, patients admitted to the coronary care unit at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn, between January 1, 1988, and July 31, 2000. Of these patients, 73 met the criteria for cardiogenic shock during their hospitalization. In-hospital and postadmission mortality were compared between diabetic and nondiabetic patients within the cardiogenic shock and nonshock patient groups, respectively. Results: In patients with AMI and cardiogenic shock, diabetes was associated with a trend for increased inhospital mortality (odds ratio, 2.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90-9.92; P=.08). In 73 patients with cardiogenic shock, estimated survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 25%, 17%, and 17%, respectively, for diabetic patients, and 50%, 44%, and 36%, respectively, for nondiabetic patients (P=.046). The association between diabetic patients and increased long-term mortality was stronger in patients with cardiogenic shock than in patients without cardiogenic shock (adjusted relative risk, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.11-3.90; P=.02). In diabetic patients without cardiogenic shock, estimated survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was low, at 75%, 61%, and 45%, respectively, compared with 83%, 76%, and 69%, respectively, for nondiabetic patients (adjusted relative risk, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.02-1.62; P=.03). Conclusions: The presence of diabetes as a comorbidity in patients with AMI appears to be associated with increased mortality compared with nondiabetic patients, and this relationship may be potentially magnified in patients who develop cardiogenic shock.

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