Effect of core suture technique and type on the gliding resistance during cyclic motion following flexor tendon repair: A cadaveric study

Tamami Moriya, Chunfeng D Zhao, Toshihiko Yamashita, Kai Nan An, Peter C Amadio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated the effects of two suture techniques using three suture types in a human model in vitro.We obtained 60 flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons from cadavers and measured the gliding resistance during 1,000 cycles of simulated flexion-extension motion and load to failure of six groups: the modified Kessler (MK) repair using 3-0 coated, braided polyester (Ethibond, Ethicon, Somerville, NJ), 3-0 coated, braided polyester/monofilament polyethylene composite (FiberWire®; Arthrex, Naples, FL), or 4-0 FiberWire; and the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) repair using 3-0 Ethibond, 3-0 FiberWire, or 4-0 FiberWire. The 3-0 Ethibond MGH suture had significantly higher ultimate load to failure than the 3-0 or 4-0 FiberWire MK suture. The 3-0 and 4-0 FiberWire MGH sutures had significantly higher load to failure than the three MK groups. The gliding resistances of the three MGH groups were significantly higher than that of the three corresponding MK groups. The MGH repair had more gliding resistance than an MK repair, even when comparing large diameter suture in the MK repair with smaller diameter suture in the MGH repair. In this study, suture technique was more important in predicting repair load to failure and gliding resistance than the nature or caliber of the suture material that was used.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1475-1481
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic Research
Volume28
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

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Suture Techniques
Tendons
Sutures
General Hospitals
Polyesters
Polyethylene
Cadaver

Keywords

  • Core suture
  • Gliding resistance
  • Human cadaver
  • Suture
  • Tendon repair

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Effect of core suture technique and type on the gliding resistance during cyclic motion following flexor tendon repair : A cadaveric study. / Moriya, Tamami; Zhao, Chunfeng D; Yamashita, Toshihiko; An, Kai Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research, Vol. 28, No. 11, 2010, p. 1475-1481.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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