Effect of brinzolamide and dorzolamide on aqueous humor flow in human eyes

Cory Ingram, Richard F. Brubaker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: To measure the relative efficacy of brinzolamide hydrochloride 1% ophthalmic suspension, a new carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, compared with the currently used dorzolamide hydrochloride 2% ophthalmic solution as suppressors of aqueous humor flow in human eyes, and to study the difference of effect during the day and at night. METHODS: A randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled study of 25 normal human subjects was carried out at Mayo Clinic. The daytime rate of aqueous humor flow was measured every 2 hours from 8 AM to 4 PM by means of fluorophotometry. Likewise, the nighttime rate of aqueous humor flow was measured every 2 hours from 12 AM to 6 AM. Intraocular pressure was measured at 4 PM and 6 AM. RESULTS: Brinzolamide reduced aqueous flow by 0.47 ± 0.20 μl per min (mean ± SD) during the day, whereas dorzolamide reduced flow by 0.34 ± 0.20 μl per min. Brinzolamide reduced aqueous flow by 0.16 ± 0.12 μl per min during the night, whereas dorzolamide reduced flow by 0.10 ± 0.13 μl per min. Brinzolamide reduced afternoon intraocular pressure by 1.5 ± 1.1 mm Hg, and dorzolamide reduced afternoon intraocular pressure by 1.1 ± 1.0 mm Hg. Brinzolamide reduced the morning awakening intraocular pressure by 0.3 ± 1.6 mm Hg, and dorzolamide reduced it by 0.8 ± 1.0 mm Hg. CONCLUSIONS: Our data support the idea that brinzolamide is at least as efficacious as dorzolamide as a suppressor of aqueous humor flow in normal human eyes and that there is probably not a clinically significant difference between the two drugs in this efficacy. Clinicians who prescribe brinzolamide should expect similar ocular hypotensive responses from brinzolamide and dorzolamide. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)292-296
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican journal of ophthalmology
Volume128
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 1999

Fingerprint

dorzolamide
Aqueous Humor
Intraocular Pressure
Fluorophotometry
Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors
brinzolamide
Ophthalmic Solutions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Effect of brinzolamide and dorzolamide on aqueous humor flow in human eyes. / Ingram, Cory; Brubaker, Richard F.

In: American journal of ophthalmology, Vol. 128, No. 3, 01.09.1999, p. 292-296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e1842651f5e64938b257c0ced3bc2e4d,
title = "Effect of brinzolamide and dorzolamide on aqueous humor flow in human eyes",
abstract = "PURPOSE: To measure the relative efficacy of brinzolamide hydrochloride 1{\%} ophthalmic suspension, a new carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, compared with the currently used dorzolamide hydrochloride 2{\%} ophthalmic solution as suppressors of aqueous humor flow in human eyes, and to study the difference of effect during the day and at night. METHODS: A randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled study of 25 normal human subjects was carried out at Mayo Clinic. The daytime rate of aqueous humor flow was measured every 2 hours from 8 AM to 4 PM by means of fluorophotometry. Likewise, the nighttime rate of aqueous humor flow was measured every 2 hours from 12 AM to 6 AM. Intraocular pressure was measured at 4 PM and 6 AM. RESULTS: Brinzolamide reduced aqueous flow by 0.47 ± 0.20 μl per min (mean ± SD) during the day, whereas dorzolamide reduced flow by 0.34 ± 0.20 μl per min. Brinzolamide reduced aqueous flow by 0.16 ± 0.12 μl per min during the night, whereas dorzolamide reduced flow by 0.10 ± 0.13 μl per min. Brinzolamide reduced afternoon intraocular pressure by 1.5 ± 1.1 mm Hg, and dorzolamide reduced afternoon intraocular pressure by 1.1 ± 1.0 mm Hg. Brinzolamide reduced the morning awakening intraocular pressure by 0.3 ± 1.6 mm Hg, and dorzolamide reduced it by 0.8 ± 1.0 mm Hg. CONCLUSIONS: Our data support the idea that brinzolamide is at least as efficacious as dorzolamide as a suppressor of aqueous humor flow in normal human eyes and that there is probably not a clinically significant difference between the two drugs in this efficacy. Clinicians who prescribe brinzolamide should expect similar ocular hypotensive responses from brinzolamide and dorzolamide. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc.",
author = "Cory Ingram and Brubaker, {Richard F.}",
year = "1999",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0002-9394(99)00179-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "128",
pages = "292--296",
journal = "American Journal of Ophthalmology",
issn = "0002-9394",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of brinzolamide and dorzolamide on aqueous humor flow in human eyes

AU - Ingram, Cory

AU - Brubaker, Richard F.

PY - 1999/9/1

Y1 - 1999/9/1

N2 - PURPOSE: To measure the relative efficacy of brinzolamide hydrochloride 1% ophthalmic suspension, a new carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, compared with the currently used dorzolamide hydrochloride 2% ophthalmic solution as suppressors of aqueous humor flow in human eyes, and to study the difference of effect during the day and at night. METHODS: A randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled study of 25 normal human subjects was carried out at Mayo Clinic. The daytime rate of aqueous humor flow was measured every 2 hours from 8 AM to 4 PM by means of fluorophotometry. Likewise, the nighttime rate of aqueous humor flow was measured every 2 hours from 12 AM to 6 AM. Intraocular pressure was measured at 4 PM and 6 AM. RESULTS: Brinzolamide reduced aqueous flow by 0.47 ± 0.20 μl per min (mean ± SD) during the day, whereas dorzolamide reduced flow by 0.34 ± 0.20 μl per min. Brinzolamide reduced aqueous flow by 0.16 ± 0.12 μl per min during the night, whereas dorzolamide reduced flow by 0.10 ± 0.13 μl per min. Brinzolamide reduced afternoon intraocular pressure by 1.5 ± 1.1 mm Hg, and dorzolamide reduced afternoon intraocular pressure by 1.1 ± 1.0 mm Hg. Brinzolamide reduced the morning awakening intraocular pressure by 0.3 ± 1.6 mm Hg, and dorzolamide reduced it by 0.8 ± 1.0 mm Hg. CONCLUSIONS: Our data support the idea that brinzolamide is at least as efficacious as dorzolamide as a suppressor of aqueous humor flow in normal human eyes and that there is probably not a clinically significant difference between the two drugs in this efficacy. Clinicians who prescribe brinzolamide should expect similar ocular hypotensive responses from brinzolamide and dorzolamide. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc.

AB - PURPOSE: To measure the relative efficacy of brinzolamide hydrochloride 1% ophthalmic suspension, a new carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, compared with the currently used dorzolamide hydrochloride 2% ophthalmic solution as suppressors of aqueous humor flow in human eyes, and to study the difference of effect during the day and at night. METHODS: A randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled study of 25 normal human subjects was carried out at Mayo Clinic. The daytime rate of aqueous humor flow was measured every 2 hours from 8 AM to 4 PM by means of fluorophotometry. Likewise, the nighttime rate of aqueous humor flow was measured every 2 hours from 12 AM to 6 AM. Intraocular pressure was measured at 4 PM and 6 AM. RESULTS: Brinzolamide reduced aqueous flow by 0.47 ± 0.20 μl per min (mean ± SD) during the day, whereas dorzolamide reduced flow by 0.34 ± 0.20 μl per min. Brinzolamide reduced aqueous flow by 0.16 ± 0.12 μl per min during the night, whereas dorzolamide reduced flow by 0.10 ± 0.13 μl per min. Brinzolamide reduced afternoon intraocular pressure by 1.5 ± 1.1 mm Hg, and dorzolamide reduced afternoon intraocular pressure by 1.1 ± 1.0 mm Hg. Brinzolamide reduced the morning awakening intraocular pressure by 0.3 ± 1.6 mm Hg, and dorzolamide reduced it by 0.8 ± 1.0 mm Hg. CONCLUSIONS: Our data support the idea that brinzolamide is at least as efficacious as dorzolamide as a suppressor of aqueous humor flow in normal human eyes and that there is probably not a clinically significant difference between the two drugs in this efficacy. Clinicians who prescribe brinzolamide should expect similar ocular hypotensive responses from brinzolamide and dorzolamide. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032855046&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032855046&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0002-9394(99)00179-8

DO - 10.1016/S0002-9394(99)00179-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 10511022

AN - SCOPUS:0032855046

VL - 128

SP - 292

EP - 296

JO - American Journal of Ophthalmology

JF - American Journal of Ophthalmology

SN - 0002-9394

IS - 3

ER -