Effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition on the incidence of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty

Frank V. Brozovich, Joel Morganroth, Neil B. Gottlieb, Ronald S. Gottlieb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

To determine whether angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition may reduce the incidence of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), we retrospectively identified 322 consecutive patients who underwent a successful procedure from June 1988 to December 1989. No patients developed chest pain, ST segment elevation, positive cardiac enzymes, or other evidence of abrupt vessel closure following the PTCA. All patients received intravenous heparin after PTCA and aspirin was begun on the day prior to PTCA. Patients were separated into two groups: those at hospital discharge incidentally treated for hypertension or heart failure with ACE inhibitors (n=36), and those treated with a drug regimen which did not include ACE inhibitors (n=286). The two groups were similar with respect to age (61 ± 13.5 vs. 60 ± 12.5, p=NS) and other demographic characteristics. Restenosis, defined as the presentation to a physician with symptoms of angina within 6 months of the PTCA and the finding on repeat catheterization of a significant restenosis at the site of the PTCA, occurred in 30% of the patients who were discharged on a drug regimen which did not include ACE inhibitors vs. 3% (p <.05) in those treated with an ACE inhibitor. Thus, it appears that the use of ACE inhibitors may significantly reduce the incidence of restenosis after successful PTCA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-267
Number of pages5
JournalCatheterization and cardiovascular diagnosis
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1991

Keywords

  • ACE inhibition
  • angioplasty
  • chest pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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