Effect of a somatostatin analogue on gastric motor and sensory functions in healthy humans

A. Foxx-Orenstein, Michael Camilleri, D. Stephens, D. Burton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Pharmacological approaches to alter satiation may have an impact on functional upper gastrointestinal disorders and potentially change food intake in obesity. Aim: Our aim was to compare the effects of two doses of octreotide and placebo on postprandial symptoms, gastric accommodation, and gastric emptying using validated non-invasive techniques. Methods: In a randomised, parallel group, two dose, double blind, placebo controlled study, 39 healthy participants (13 per group) were randomised to 30 or 100 μg octreotide or placebo, administered subcutaneously, 30 minutes before each study. Studies were performed on three separate days and included scintigraphic gastric emptying of solids and liquids, 99mTc SPECT imaging to measure fasting stomach volume and gastric accommodation following a 300 ml Ensure meal, and a standardised nutrient drink test to measure maximum tolerated volume and postprandial symptoms. Results: Relative to placebo, both doses of octreotide delayed gastric emptying of solids (not liquids), increased fasting gastric volume, reduced the change in gastric volume post meal, and decreased the sensation of fullness after a satiating meal. Conclusion: The somatostatin analogue octreotide significantly alters human gastric functions, including inhibition of the normal reflex responses of gastric volume increase and emptying of the meal. These pharmacological effects suggest studies of the medication in disorders of satiation, including obesity and dyspepsia, are warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1555-1561
Number of pages7
JournalGut
Volume52
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2003

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Somatostatin
Stomach
Octreotide
Meals
Gastric Emptying
Placebos
Satiation
Fasting
Obesity
Pharmacology
Gastrointestinal Diseases
Dyspepsia
Single-Photon Emission-Computed Tomography
Reflex
Healthy Volunteers
Eating
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Effect of a somatostatin analogue on gastric motor and sensory functions in healthy humans. / Foxx-Orenstein, A.; Camilleri, Michael; Stephens, D.; Burton, D.

In: Gut, Vol. 52, No. 11, 11.2003, p. 1555-1561.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Foxx-Orenstein, A. ; Camilleri, Michael ; Stephens, D. ; Burton, D. / Effect of a somatostatin analogue on gastric motor and sensory functions in healthy humans. In: Gut. 2003 ; Vol. 52, No. 11. pp. 1555-1561.
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