Effect of a Motivational Interviewing-Based Health Coaching on Quality of Life in Subjects With COPD

Hamid Rehman, Craig Karpman, Kristin Vickers Douglas, Roberto P Benzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Improving quality of life (QOL) is a key goal in the care of patients with COPD. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) has clearly been shown to improve QOL, but is not accessible to many eligible patients. There is a need for alternative programs designed to improve patient well-being that are accessible to all patients with COPD. Our goal was to pilot test a simple, telephone-based health-coaching intervention that was recently shown to decrease readmission among hospitalized COPD patients and stable COPD patients eligible for PR.

METHODS: Subjects received a 3-month intervention consisting of 10 health-coaching telephone calls based on motivational interviewing principles. Outcome measures included dyspnea level, measured by the modified Medical Research Council scale, and QOL, measured by the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire and a single-item general self-rated health status.

RESULTS: Fifty subjects with moderate to severe COPD were enrolled in the study. Forty-four subjects (86%) completed the study intervention. Dyspnea measured by the modified Medical Research Council score improved significantly after the intervention (P = .002). The domains of fatigue, emotional function, and mastery on the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire and the single-item QOL question also improved significantly after the 3 months of health coaching (P = .001, P = .001, P = .007, and P = .03, respectively). Thirty-six (71%) subjects had a clinically meaningful improvement in at least 1 study end point (either in the severity of dyspnea or a domain of QOL). Thirty subjects (58%) had an improvement of ≥0.5 points, the minimum clinically important difference in at least 1 component of the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire.

CONCLUSIONS: A telephone-delivered motivational interviewing-based coaching program for COPD patients is a feasible, well-accepted (by both participants and providers), simple, and novel intervention to improve the well-being of patients with COPD. This pilot study provides insight into a possible alternative to a conventional PR program for patients with limited access to that program.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1043-1048
Number of pages6
JournalRespiratory Care
Volume62
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

Fingerprint

Motivational Interviewing
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Quality of Life
Health
Telephone
Dyspnea
Rehabilitation
Lung
Biomedical Research
Chronic Disease
Mentoring
Health Status
Fatigue
Patient Care
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • COPD
  • health coaching
  • health status
  • health-related quality of life
  • mMRC
  • motivational interviewing
  • physical status
  • pulmonary rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Effect of a Motivational Interviewing-Based Health Coaching on Quality of Life in Subjects With COPD. / Rehman, Hamid; Karpman, Craig; Vickers Douglas, Kristin; Benzo, Roberto P.

In: Respiratory Care, Vol. 62, No. 8, 01.08.2017, p. 1043-1048.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rehman, Hamid ; Karpman, Craig ; Vickers Douglas, Kristin ; Benzo, Roberto P. / Effect of a Motivational Interviewing-Based Health Coaching on Quality of Life in Subjects With COPD. In: Respiratory Care. 2017 ; Vol. 62, No. 8. pp. 1043-1048.
@article{48438d5187c8469a882476232b8a87e8,
title = "Effect of a Motivational Interviewing-Based Health Coaching on Quality of Life in Subjects With COPD",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Improving quality of life (QOL) is a key goal in the care of patients with COPD. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) has clearly been shown to improve QOL, but is not accessible to many eligible patients. There is a need for alternative programs designed to improve patient well-being that are accessible to all patients with COPD. Our goal was to pilot test a simple, telephone-based health-coaching intervention that was recently shown to decrease readmission among hospitalized COPD patients and stable COPD patients eligible for PR.METHODS: Subjects received a 3-month intervention consisting of 10 health-coaching telephone calls based on motivational interviewing principles. Outcome measures included dyspnea level, measured by the modified Medical Research Council scale, and QOL, measured by the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire and a single-item general self-rated health status.RESULTS: Fifty subjects with moderate to severe COPD were enrolled in the study. Forty-four subjects (86{\%}) completed the study intervention. Dyspnea measured by the modified Medical Research Council score improved significantly after the intervention (P = .002). The domains of fatigue, emotional function, and mastery on the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire and the single-item QOL question also improved significantly after the 3 months of health coaching (P = .001, P = .001, P = .007, and P = .03, respectively). Thirty-six (71{\%}) subjects had a clinically meaningful improvement in at least 1 study end point (either in the severity of dyspnea or a domain of QOL). Thirty subjects (58{\%}) had an improvement of ≥0.5 points, the minimum clinically important difference in at least 1 component of the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire.CONCLUSIONS: A telephone-delivered motivational interviewing-based coaching program for COPD patients is a feasible, well-accepted (by both participants and providers), simple, and novel intervention to improve the well-being of patients with COPD. This pilot study provides insight into a possible alternative to a conventional PR program for patients with limited access to that program.",
keywords = "COPD, health coaching, health status, health-related quality of life, mMRC, motivational interviewing, physical status, pulmonary rehabilitation",
author = "Hamid Rehman and Craig Karpman and {Vickers Douglas}, Kristin and Benzo, {Roberto P}",
year = "2017",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4187/respcare.04984",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "62",
pages = "1043--1048",
journal = "Respiratory Care",
issn = "0020-1324",
publisher = "Daedalus Enterprises Inc.",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of a Motivational Interviewing-Based Health Coaching on Quality of Life in Subjects With COPD

AU - Rehman, Hamid

AU - Karpman, Craig

AU - Vickers Douglas, Kristin

AU - Benzo, Roberto P

PY - 2017/8/1

Y1 - 2017/8/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Improving quality of life (QOL) is a key goal in the care of patients with COPD. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) has clearly been shown to improve QOL, but is not accessible to many eligible patients. There is a need for alternative programs designed to improve patient well-being that are accessible to all patients with COPD. Our goal was to pilot test a simple, telephone-based health-coaching intervention that was recently shown to decrease readmission among hospitalized COPD patients and stable COPD patients eligible for PR.METHODS: Subjects received a 3-month intervention consisting of 10 health-coaching telephone calls based on motivational interviewing principles. Outcome measures included dyspnea level, measured by the modified Medical Research Council scale, and QOL, measured by the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire and a single-item general self-rated health status.RESULTS: Fifty subjects with moderate to severe COPD were enrolled in the study. Forty-four subjects (86%) completed the study intervention. Dyspnea measured by the modified Medical Research Council score improved significantly after the intervention (P = .002). The domains of fatigue, emotional function, and mastery on the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire and the single-item QOL question also improved significantly after the 3 months of health coaching (P = .001, P = .001, P = .007, and P = .03, respectively). Thirty-six (71%) subjects had a clinically meaningful improvement in at least 1 study end point (either in the severity of dyspnea or a domain of QOL). Thirty subjects (58%) had an improvement of ≥0.5 points, the minimum clinically important difference in at least 1 component of the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire.CONCLUSIONS: A telephone-delivered motivational interviewing-based coaching program for COPD patients is a feasible, well-accepted (by both participants and providers), simple, and novel intervention to improve the well-being of patients with COPD. This pilot study provides insight into a possible alternative to a conventional PR program for patients with limited access to that program.

AB - BACKGROUND: Improving quality of life (QOL) is a key goal in the care of patients with COPD. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) has clearly been shown to improve QOL, but is not accessible to many eligible patients. There is a need for alternative programs designed to improve patient well-being that are accessible to all patients with COPD. Our goal was to pilot test a simple, telephone-based health-coaching intervention that was recently shown to decrease readmission among hospitalized COPD patients and stable COPD patients eligible for PR.METHODS: Subjects received a 3-month intervention consisting of 10 health-coaching telephone calls based on motivational interviewing principles. Outcome measures included dyspnea level, measured by the modified Medical Research Council scale, and QOL, measured by the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire and a single-item general self-rated health status.RESULTS: Fifty subjects with moderate to severe COPD were enrolled in the study. Forty-four subjects (86%) completed the study intervention. Dyspnea measured by the modified Medical Research Council score improved significantly after the intervention (P = .002). The domains of fatigue, emotional function, and mastery on the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire and the single-item QOL question also improved significantly after the 3 months of health coaching (P = .001, P = .001, P = .007, and P = .03, respectively). Thirty-six (71%) subjects had a clinically meaningful improvement in at least 1 study end point (either in the severity of dyspnea or a domain of QOL). Thirty subjects (58%) had an improvement of ≥0.5 points, the minimum clinically important difference in at least 1 component of the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire.CONCLUSIONS: A telephone-delivered motivational interviewing-based coaching program for COPD patients is a feasible, well-accepted (by both participants and providers), simple, and novel intervention to improve the well-being of patients with COPD. This pilot study provides insight into a possible alternative to a conventional PR program for patients with limited access to that program.

KW - COPD

KW - health coaching

KW - health status

KW - health-related quality of life

KW - mMRC

KW - motivational interviewing

KW - physical status

KW - pulmonary rehabilitation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85046255883&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85046255883&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4187/respcare.04984

DO - 10.4187/respcare.04984

M3 - Article

C2 - 28611230

AN - SCOPUS:85046255883

VL - 62

SP - 1043

EP - 1048

JO - Respiratory Care

JF - Respiratory Care

SN - 0020-1324

IS - 8

ER -