Educational Technologies for Physician Continuous Professional Development: A National Survey

David Allan Cook, Morris J. Blachman, David W. Price, Colin Patrick West, Barbara L. Baasch Thomas, Richard A. Berger, Christopher M. Wittich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine the past experiences with, current use of, and anticipated use of online learning and simulation-based education among practicing U.S. physicians, and how findings vary by age. METHOD: The authors surveyed 4,648 randomly sampled board-certified U.S. physicians, September 2015 to April 2016, using Internet-based and paper questionnaires. Survey items (some optional) addressed past and current technology usage, perceived technology effectiveness, and anticipated future use of specific technology innovations. RESULTS: Of 988 respondents, 444 completed optional items. Of these, 429/442 (97.1%) had used online learning and 372/442 (84.2%) had used simulation-based education in the past five years. Desire for more online learning was modest (mean [standard deviation], 4.6 [1.5]; 1 = strongly disagree, 7 = strongly agree), as was desire for more simulation-based education (4.2 [1.7]). Both online learning and simulation-based education were perceived as effective (5.2 [1.4]; 5.0 [1.4]). Physicians believed they possess adequate skills for online learning (5.8 [1.2]) and that point-of-care learning is vital to effective patient care (5.3 [1.3]). Only 39.0% used objective performance data to guide their learning choices, although 64.6% agreed that such information would be useful. The highest-rated innovations included a central repository for listing educational opportunities and tracking continuing education credits, an app to award credit for answering patient-focused questions, 5-minute and 20-minute clinical updates, and an e-mailed “question of the week.” Responses to most survey items were similar across age groups. CONCLUSIONS: Practicing physicians generally seem receptive and prepared to use a variety of educational technologies, regardless of age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAcademic Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 27 2017

Fingerprint

Educational Technology
educational technology
physician
Learning
Physicians
learning
Education
simulation
education
Technology
Patient Credit and Collection
credit
Point-of-Care Systems
innovation
Continuing Education
educational opportunity
Surveys and Questionnaires
patient care
Internet
age group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Cook, D. A., Blachman, M. J., Price, D. W., West, C. P., Baasch Thomas, B. L., Berger, R. A., & Wittich, C. M. (Accepted/In press). Educational Technologies for Physician Continuous Professional Development: A National Survey. Academic Medicine. https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000001817

Educational Technologies for Physician Continuous Professional Development : A National Survey. / Cook, David Allan; Blachman, Morris J.; Price, David W.; West, Colin Patrick; Baasch Thomas, Barbara L.; Berger, Richard A.; Wittich, Christopher M.

In: Academic Medicine, 27.06.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cook, David Allan ; Blachman, Morris J. ; Price, David W. ; West, Colin Patrick ; Baasch Thomas, Barbara L. ; Berger, Richard A. ; Wittich, Christopher M. / Educational Technologies for Physician Continuous Professional Development : A National Survey. In: Academic Medicine. 2017.
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