Educating fellows in practice-based learning and improvement and systems-based practice: The value of quality improvement in clinical practice

William A. Carey, Christopher E. Colby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: In 1999, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education identified 6 general competencies in which all residents must receive training. In the decade since these requirements went into effect, practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI) and systems-based practice (SBP) have proven to be the most challenging competencies to teach and assess. Because PBLI and SBP both are related to quality improvement (QI) principles and processes, we developed a QI-based curriculum to teach these competencies to our fellows. Methods: This experiential curriculum engaged our fellows in our neonatal intensive care unit's (NICU's) structured QI process. After identifying specific patient outcomes in need of improvement, our fellows applied validated QI methods to develop evidence-based treatment protocols for our neonatal intensive care unit. Results: These projects led to immediate and meaningful improvements in patient care and also afforded our fellows various means by which to demonstrate their competence in PBLI and SBP. Our use of portfolios enabled us to document our fellows' performance in these competencies quite easily and comprehensively. Discussion: Given the clinical and educational structures common to most intensive care unit-based training programs, we believe that a QI-based curriculum such as ours could be adapted by others to teach and assess PBLI and SBP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Critical Care
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013

Fingerprint

Quality Improvement
Learning
Curriculum
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Graduate Medical Education
Accreditation
Clinical Protocols
Mental Competency
Intensive Care Units
Patient Care
Education

Keywords

  • Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education
  • Practice-based learning and improvement
  • Quality improvement
  • Systems-based practice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Educating fellows in practice-based learning and improvement and systems-based practice : The value of quality improvement in clinical practice. / Carey, William A.; Colby, Christopher E.

In: Journal of Critical Care, Vol. 28, No. 1, 02.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4542f698c8ef4f5493f2a0b5f6f54f44,
title = "Educating fellows in practice-based learning and improvement and systems-based practice: The value of quality improvement in clinical practice",
abstract = "Introduction: In 1999, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education identified 6 general competencies in which all residents must receive training. In the decade since these requirements went into effect, practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI) and systems-based practice (SBP) have proven to be the most challenging competencies to teach and assess. Because PBLI and SBP both are related to quality improvement (QI) principles and processes, we developed a QI-based curriculum to teach these competencies to our fellows. Methods: This experiential curriculum engaged our fellows in our neonatal intensive care unit's (NICU's) structured QI process. After identifying specific patient outcomes in need of improvement, our fellows applied validated QI methods to develop evidence-based treatment protocols for our neonatal intensive care unit. Results: These projects led to immediate and meaningful improvements in patient care and also afforded our fellows various means by which to demonstrate their competence in PBLI and SBP. Our use of portfolios enabled us to document our fellows' performance in these competencies quite easily and comprehensively. Discussion: Given the clinical and educational structures common to most intensive care unit-based training programs, we believe that a QI-based curriculum such as ours could be adapted by others to teach and assess PBLI and SBP.",
keywords = "Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, Practice-based learning and improvement, Quality improvement, Systems-based practice",
author = "Carey, {William A.} and Colby, {Christopher E.}",
year = "2013",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1016/j.jcrc.2012.07.003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "28",
journal = "Journal of Critical Care",
issn = "0883-9441",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Educating fellows in practice-based learning and improvement and systems-based practice

T2 - The value of quality improvement in clinical practice

AU - Carey, William A.

AU - Colby, Christopher E.

PY - 2013/2

Y1 - 2013/2

N2 - Introduction: In 1999, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education identified 6 general competencies in which all residents must receive training. In the decade since these requirements went into effect, practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI) and systems-based practice (SBP) have proven to be the most challenging competencies to teach and assess. Because PBLI and SBP both are related to quality improvement (QI) principles and processes, we developed a QI-based curriculum to teach these competencies to our fellows. Methods: This experiential curriculum engaged our fellows in our neonatal intensive care unit's (NICU's) structured QI process. After identifying specific patient outcomes in need of improvement, our fellows applied validated QI methods to develop evidence-based treatment protocols for our neonatal intensive care unit. Results: These projects led to immediate and meaningful improvements in patient care and also afforded our fellows various means by which to demonstrate their competence in PBLI and SBP. Our use of portfolios enabled us to document our fellows' performance in these competencies quite easily and comprehensively. Discussion: Given the clinical and educational structures common to most intensive care unit-based training programs, we believe that a QI-based curriculum such as ours could be adapted by others to teach and assess PBLI and SBP.

AB - Introduction: In 1999, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education identified 6 general competencies in which all residents must receive training. In the decade since these requirements went into effect, practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI) and systems-based practice (SBP) have proven to be the most challenging competencies to teach and assess. Because PBLI and SBP both are related to quality improvement (QI) principles and processes, we developed a QI-based curriculum to teach these competencies to our fellows. Methods: This experiential curriculum engaged our fellows in our neonatal intensive care unit's (NICU's) structured QI process. After identifying specific patient outcomes in need of improvement, our fellows applied validated QI methods to develop evidence-based treatment protocols for our neonatal intensive care unit. Results: These projects led to immediate and meaningful improvements in patient care and also afforded our fellows various means by which to demonstrate their competence in PBLI and SBP. Our use of portfolios enabled us to document our fellows' performance in these competencies quite easily and comprehensively. Discussion: Given the clinical and educational structures common to most intensive care unit-based training programs, we believe that a QI-based curriculum such as ours could be adapted by others to teach and assess PBLI and SBP.

KW - Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education

KW - Practice-based learning and improvement

KW - Quality improvement

KW - Systems-based practice

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84870832275&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84870832275&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jcrc.2012.07.003

DO - 10.1016/j.jcrc.2012.07.003

M3 - Article

C2 - 22884535

AN - SCOPUS:84870832275

VL - 28

JO - Journal of Critical Care

JF - Journal of Critical Care

SN - 0883-9441

IS - 1

ER -