Editorial: Identifying Colonic Motor Dysfunction in Chronic Constipation with High-Resolution Manometry: Pan-Colonic Pressurizations

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In selected centers, colonic manometry with non-high-resolution catheters is used to document colonic motor dysfunction in chronic constipation. Recently, high-resolution manometry (HRM) catheters, with more closely spaced sensors have been used for this purpose. Corestti et al. assessed colonic pressures with HRM in 17 healthy people and 10 constipated patients. The main finding was pan-colonic pressurizations, which occurred frequently, increased after eating and cholinergic stimulation, were associated with the desire to pass flatus, and were less frequent in slow-transit constipation. These events resemble esophageal common cavity pressure waves. Further studies are necessary to understand the pathogenesis, functional consequences, and clinical utility of pan-colonic pressurizations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)490-492
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume112
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

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Manometry
Constipation
Catheters
Flatulence
Pressure
Cholinergic Agents
Eating

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

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title = "Editorial: Identifying Colonic Motor Dysfunction in Chronic Constipation with High-Resolution Manometry: Pan-Colonic Pressurizations",
abstract = "In selected centers, colonic manometry with non-high-resolution catheters is used to document colonic motor dysfunction in chronic constipation. Recently, high-resolution manometry (HRM) catheters, with more closely spaced sensors have been used for this purpose. Corestti et al. assessed colonic pressures with HRM in 17 healthy people and 10 constipated patients. The main finding was pan-colonic pressurizations, which occurred frequently, increased after eating and cholinergic stimulation, were associated with the desire to pass flatus, and were less frequent in slow-transit constipation. These events resemble esophageal common cavity pressure waves. Further studies are necessary to understand the pathogenesis, functional consequences, and clinical utility of pan-colonic pressurizations.",
author = "Bharucha, {Adil Eddie}",
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N2 - In selected centers, colonic manometry with non-high-resolution catheters is used to document colonic motor dysfunction in chronic constipation. Recently, high-resolution manometry (HRM) catheters, with more closely spaced sensors have been used for this purpose. Corestti et al. assessed colonic pressures with HRM in 17 healthy people and 10 constipated patients. The main finding was pan-colonic pressurizations, which occurred frequently, increased after eating and cholinergic stimulation, were associated with the desire to pass flatus, and were less frequent in slow-transit constipation. These events resemble esophageal common cavity pressure waves. Further studies are necessary to understand the pathogenesis, functional consequences, and clinical utility of pan-colonic pressurizations.

AB - In selected centers, colonic manometry with non-high-resolution catheters is used to document colonic motor dysfunction in chronic constipation. Recently, high-resolution manometry (HRM) catheters, with more closely spaced sensors have been used for this purpose. Corestti et al. assessed colonic pressures with HRM in 17 healthy people and 10 constipated patients. The main finding was pan-colonic pressurizations, which occurred frequently, increased after eating and cholinergic stimulation, were associated with the desire to pass flatus, and were less frequent in slow-transit constipation. These events resemble esophageal common cavity pressure waves. Further studies are necessary to understand the pathogenesis, functional consequences, and clinical utility of pan-colonic pressurizations.

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