Ebstein anomaly review: What's now, what's next?

Joseph A. Dearani, Bassem N. Mora, Timothy J Nelson, Dawit T. Haile, Patrick W. O'Leary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ebstein anomaly accounts for 1% of all congenital heart disease. It is a right ventricular myopathy with failure of tricuspid valve delamination and highly variable tricuspid valve morphology that usually results in severe regurgitation. It is the only congenital heart lesion that has a range of clinical presentations, from the severely symptomatic neonate to an asymptomatic adult. Neonatal operation has high operative mortality, whereas operation performed beyond infancy and into adulthood has low operative mortality. Late survival and quality of life for hospital survivors are excellent for the majority of patients in all age brackets. Atrial tachyarrhythmias are the most common late complication. There have been more techniques of tricuspid repair reported in the literature than any other congenital or acquired cardiac lesion. This is largely due to the infinite anatomic variability encountered with this anomaly. The cone reconstruction of Ebstein anomaly can achieve near anatomic restoration of the tricuspid valve anatomy. Early and intermediate results with these repairs are promising. Reduced right ventricular function continues to be a challenge for some patients, as is the need for reoperation for recurrent tricuspid regurgitation. The purpose of this article is to outline the current standard of care for diagnosis and treatment of Ebstein anomaly and describe innovative strategies to address poor right ventricular function and associated right-sided heart failure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1101-1109
Number of pages9
JournalExpert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy
Volume13
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 3 2015

Fingerprint

Ebstein Anomaly
Tricuspid Valve
Right Ventricular Function
Tricuspid Valve Insufficiency
Mortality
Muscular Diseases
Standard of Care
Reoperation
Tachycardia
Survivors
Heart Diseases
Anatomy
Heart Failure
Quality of Life
Newborn Infant
Survival
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • cone reconstruction
  • Ebstein anomaly
  • stem cell therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Ebstein anomaly review : What's now, what's next? / Dearani, Joseph A.; Mora, Bassem N.; Nelson, Timothy J; Haile, Dawit T.; O'Leary, Patrick W.

In: Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy, Vol. 13, No. 10, 03.10.2015, p. 1101-1109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dearani, Joseph A. ; Mora, Bassem N. ; Nelson, Timothy J ; Haile, Dawit T. ; O'Leary, Patrick W. / Ebstein anomaly review : What's now, what's next?. In: Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy. 2015 ; Vol. 13, No. 10. pp. 1101-1109.
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