Early regression of severe left ventricular hypertrophy after transcatheter aortic valve replacement is associated with decreased hospitalizations

Brian R. Lindman, William J. Stewart, Philippe Pibarot, Rebecca T. Hahn, Catherine M. Otto, Ke Xu, Richard B. Devereux, Neil J. Weissman, Maurice E Sarano, Wilson Y. Szeto, Raj Makkar, D. Craig Miller, Stamatios Lerakis, Samir Kapadia, Bruce Bowers, Kevin L. Greason, Thomas C. McAndrew, Yang Lei, Martin B. Leon, Pamela S. Douglas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives This study sought to examine the relationship between left ventricular mass (LVM) regression and clinical outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Background LVM regression after valve replacement for aortic stenosis is assumed to be a favorable effect of LV unloading, but its relationship to improved clinical outcomes is unclear. Methods Of 2,115 patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis at high surgical risk receiving TAVR in the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves) randomized trial or continued access registry, 690 had both severe LV hypertrophy (left ventricular mass index [LVMi] 149 g/m2 men, 122 g/m2 women) at baseline and an LVMi measurement at 30-day post-TAVR follow-up. Clinical outcomes were compared for patients with greater than versus lesser than median percentage change in LVMi between baseline and 30 days using Cox proportional hazard models to evaluate event rates from 30 to 365 days. Results Compared with patients with lesser regression, patients with greater LVMi regression had a similar rate of all-cause mortality (14.1% vs. 14.3%, p = 0.99), but a lower rate of rehospitalization (9.5% vs. 18.5%, hazard ratio [HR]: 0.50, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.32 to 0.78; p = 0.002) and a lower rate of rehospitalization specifically for heart failure (7.3% vs. 13.6%, p = 0.01). The association with a lower rate of rehospitalization was consistent across subgroups and remained significant after multivariable adjustment (HR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.34 to 0.84; p = 0.007). Patients with greater LVMi regression had lower B-type natriuretic peptide (p = 0.002) and a trend toward better quality of life (p = 0.06) at 1-year follow-up than did those with lesser regression. Conclusions In high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis and severe LV hypertrophy undergoing TAVR, those with greater early LVM regression had one-half the rate of rehospitalization over the subsequent year compared to those with lesser regression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)662-673
Number of pages12
JournalJACC: Cardiovascular Interventions
Volume7
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Left Ventricular Hypertrophy
Hospitalization
Aortic Valve Stenosis
Confidence Intervals
Brain Natriuretic Peptide
Aortic Valve
Proportional Hazards Models
Hypertrophy
Registries
Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement
Heart Failure
Quality of Life
Mortality

Keywords

  • aortic stenosis
  • heart failure
  • hospitalizations
  • hypertrophic left ventricular remodeling
  • transcatheter aortic valve replacement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Early regression of severe left ventricular hypertrophy after transcatheter aortic valve replacement is associated with decreased hospitalizations. / Lindman, Brian R.; Stewart, William J.; Pibarot, Philippe; Hahn, Rebecca T.; Otto, Catherine M.; Xu, Ke; Devereux, Richard B.; Weissman, Neil J.; Sarano, Maurice E; Szeto, Wilson Y.; Makkar, Raj; Miller, D. Craig; Lerakis, Stamatios; Kapadia, Samir; Bowers, Bruce; Greason, Kevin L.; McAndrew, Thomas C.; Lei, Yang; Leon, Martin B.; Douglas, Pamela S.

In: JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions, Vol. 7, No. 6, 2014, p. 662-673.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lindman, BR, Stewart, WJ, Pibarot, P, Hahn, RT, Otto, CM, Xu, K, Devereux, RB, Weissman, NJ, Sarano, ME, Szeto, WY, Makkar, R, Miller, DC, Lerakis, S, Kapadia, S, Bowers, B, Greason, KL, McAndrew, TC, Lei, Y, Leon, MB & Douglas, PS 2014, 'Early regression of severe left ventricular hypertrophy after transcatheter aortic valve replacement is associated with decreased hospitalizations', JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions, vol. 7, no. 6, pp. 662-673. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcin.2014.02.011
Lindman, Brian R. ; Stewart, William J. ; Pibarot, Philippe ; Hahn, Rebecca T. ; Otto, Catherine M. ; Xu, Ke ; Devereux, Richard B. ; Weissman, Neil J. ; Sarano, Maurice E ; Szeto, Wilson Y. ; Makkar, Raj ; Miller, D. Craig ; Lerakis, Stamatios ; Kapadia, Samir ; Bowers, Bruce ; Greason, Kevin L. ; McAndrew, Thomas C. ; Lei, Yang ; Leon, Martin B. ; Douglas, Pamela S. / Early regression of severe left ventricular hypertrophy after transcatheter aortic valve replacement is associated with decreased hospitalizations. In: JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions. 2014 ; Vol. 7, No. 6. pp. 662-673.
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abstract = "Objectives This study sought to examine the relationship between left ventricular mass (LVM) regression and clinical outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Background LVM regression after valve replacement for aortic stenosis is assumed to be a favorable effect of LV unloading, but its relationship to improved clinical outcomes is unclear. Methods Of 2,115 patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis at high surgical risk receiving TAVR in the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves) randomized trial or continued access registry, 690 had both severe LV hypertrophy (left ventricular mass index [LVMi] 149 g/m2 men, 122 g/m2 women) at baseline and an LVMi measurement at 30-day post-TAVR follow-up. Clinical outcomes were compared for patients with greater than versus lesser than median percentage change in LVMi between baseline and 30 days using Cox proportional hazard models to evaluate event rates from 30 to 365 days. Results Compared with patients with lesser regression, patients with greater LVMi regression had a similar rate of all-cause mortality (14.1{\%} vs. 14.3{\%}, p = 0.99), but a lower rate of rehospitalization (9.5{\%} vs. 18.5{\%}, hazard ratio [HR]: 0.50, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 0.32 to 0.78; p = 0.002) and a lower rate of rehospitalization specifically for heart failure (7.3{\%} vs. 13.6{\%}, p = 0.01). The association with a lower rate of rehospitalization was consistent across subgroups and remained significant after multivariable adjustment (HR: 0.53, 95{\%} CI: 0.34 to 0.84; p = 0.007). Patients with greater LVMi regression had lower B-type natriuretic peptide (p = 0.002) and a trend toward better quality of life (p = 0.06) at 1-year follow-up than did those with lesser regression. Conclusions In high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis and severe LV hypertrophy undergoing TAVR, those with greater early LVM regression had one-half the rate of rehospitalization over the subsequent year compared to those with lesser regression.",
keywords = "aortic stenosis, heart failure, hospitalizations, hypertrophic left ventricular remodeling, transcatheter aortic valve replacement",
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T1 - Early regression of severe left ventricular hypertrophy after transcatheter aortic valve replacement is associated with decreased hospitalizations

AU - Lindman, Brian R.

AU - Stewart, William J.

AU - Pibarot, Philippe

AU - Hahn, Rebecca T.

AU - Otto, Catherine M.

AU - Xu, Ke

AU - Devereux, Richard B.

AU - Weissman, Neil J.

AU - Sarano, Maurice E

AU - Szeto, Wilson Y.

AU - Makkar, Raj

AU - Miller, D. Craig

AU - Lerakis, Stamatios

AU - Kapadia, Samir

AU - Bowers, Bruce

AU - Greason, Kevin L.

AU - McAndrew, Thomas C.

AU - Lei, Yang

AU - Leon, Martin B.

AU - Douglas, Pamela S.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Objectives This study sought to examine the relationship between left ventricular mass (LVM) regression and clinical outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Background LVM regression after valve replacement for aortic stenosis is assumed to be a favorable effect of LV unloading, but its relationship to improved clinical outcomes is unclear. Methods Of 2,115 patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis at high surgical risk receiving TAVR in the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves) randomized trial or continued access registry, 690 had both severe LV hypertrophy (left ventricular mass index [LVMi] 149 g/m2 men, 122 g/m2 women) at baseline and an LVMi measurement at 30-day post-TAVR follow-up. Clinical outcomes were compared for patients with greater than versus lesser than median percentage change in LVMi between baseline and 30 days using Cox proportional hazard models to evaluate event rates from 30 to 365 days. Results Compared with patients with lesser regression, patients with greater LVMi regression had a similar rate of all-cause mortality (14.1% vs. 14.3%, p = 0.99), but a lower rate of rehospitalization (9.5% vs. 18.5%, hazard ratio [HR]: 0.50, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.32 to 0.78; p = 0.002) and a lower rate of rehospitalization specifically for heart failure (7.3% vs. 13.6%, p = 0.01). The association with a lower rate of rehospitalization was consistent across subgroups and remained significant after multivariable adjustment (HR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.34 to 0.84; p = 0.007). Patients with greater LVMi regression had lower B-type natriuretic peptide (p = 0.002) and a trend toward better quality of life (p = 0.06) at 1-year follow-up than did those with lesser regression. Conclusions In high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis and severe LV hypertrophy undergoing TAVR, those with greater early LVM regression had one-half the rate of rehospitalization over the subsequent year compared to those with lesser regression.

AB - Objectives This study sought to examine the relationship between left ventricular mass (LVM) regression and clinical outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Background LVM regression after valve replacement for aortic stenosis is assumed to be a favorable effect of LV unloading, but its relationship to improved clinical outcomes is unclear. Methods Of 2,115 patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis at high surgical risk receiving TAVR in the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves) randomized trial or continued access registry, 690 had both severe LV hypertrophy (left ventricular mass index [LVMi] 149 g/m2 men, 122 g/m2 women) at baseline and an LVMi measurement at 30-day post-TAVR follow-up. Clinical outcomes were compared for patients with greater than versus lesser than median percentage change in LVMi between baseline and 30 days using Cox proportional hazard models to evaluate event rates from 30 to 365 days. Results Compared with patients with lesser regression, patients with greater LVMi regression had a similar rate of all-cause mortality (14.1% vs. 14.3%, p = 0.99), but a lower rate of rehospitalization (9.5% vs. 18.5%, hazard ratio [HR]: 0.50, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.32 to 0.78; p = 0.002) and a lower rate of rehospitalization specifically for heart failure (7.3% vs. 13.6%, p = 0.01). The association with a lower rate of rehospitalization was consistent across subgroups and remained significant after multivariable adjustment (HR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.34 to 0.84; p = 0.007). Patients with greater LVMi regression had lower B-type natriuretic peptide (p = 0.002) and a trend toward better quality of life (p = 0.06) at 1-year follow-up than did those with lesser regression. Conclusions In high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis and severe LV hypertrophy undergoing TAVR, those with greater early LVM regression had one-half the rate of rehospitalization over the subsequent year compared to those with lesser regression.

KW - aortic stenosis

KW - heart failure

KW - hospitalizations

KW - hypertrophic left ventricular remodeling

KW - transcatheter aortic valve replacement

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