Early recognition of malnutrition and cachexia in the cancer patient: A position paper of a European School of Oncology Task Force

M. Aapro, J. Arends, F. Bozzetti, Ken Fearon, S. M. Grunberg, J. Herrstedt, J. Hopkinson, N. Jacquelin-Ravel, Aminah Jatoi, S. Kaasa, F. Strasser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

120 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Weight loss and cachexia are common, reduce tolerance of cancer treatment and the likelihood of response, and independently predict poor outcome. Methods: A group of experts met under the auspices of the European School of Oncology to review the literature and- on the basis of the limited evidence at present-make recommendations for malnutrition and cachexia management and future research. Conclusions: Our focus should move from end-stage wasting to supporting patients' nutritional and functional state throughout the increasingly complex and prolonged course of anti-cancer treatment. When inadequate nutrient intake predominates (malnutrition), this can be managed by conventional nutritional support. In the presence of systemic inflammation/ altered metabolism (cachexia), a multi-modal approach including novel therapeutic agents is required. For all patients, oncologists should consider three supportive care issues: ensuring sufficient energy and protein intake, maintaining physical activity to maintain muscle mass and (if present) reducing systemic inflammation. The results of phase II/III trials based on novel drug targets (e.g. cytokines, ghrelin receptor, androgen receptor, myostatin) are expected in the next 2 years. If effective therapies emerge, early detection of malnutrition and cachexia will be increasingly important in the hope that timely intervention can improve both patient-centered and oncology outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbermdu085
Pages (from-to)1492-1499
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Oncology
Volume25
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Cachexia
Advisory Committees
Malnutrition
Neoplasms
Ghrelin Receptor
Myostatin
Inflammation
Cytokine Receptors
Nutritional Support
Androgen Receptors
Therapeutics
Energy Intake
Weight Loss
Exercise
Food
Muscles
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Proteins

Keywords

  • Cancer cachexia
  • Malnutrition
  • Nutritional support
  • Review
  • Systemic inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Hematology

Cite this

Aapro, M., Arends, J., Bozzetti, F., Fearon, K., Grunberg, S. M., Herrstedt, J., ... Strasser, F. (2014). Early recognition of malnutrition and cachexia in the cancer patient: A position paper of a European School of Oncology Task Force. Annals of Oncology, 25(8), 1492-1499. [mdu085]. https://doi.org/10.1093/annonc/mdu085

Early recognition of malnutrition and cachexia in the cancer patient : A position paper of a European School of Oncology Task Force. / Aapro, M.; Arends, J.; Bozzetti, F.; Fearon, Ken; Grunberg, S. M.; Herrstedt, J.; Hopkinson, J.; Jacquelin-Ravel, N.; Jatoi, Aminah; Kaasa, S.; Strasser, F.

In: Annals of Oncology, Vol. 25, No. 8, mdu085, 2014, p. 1492-1499.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Aapro, M, Arends, J, Bozzetti, F, Fearon, K, Grunberg, SM, Herrstedt, J, Hopkinson, J, Jacquelin-Ravel, N, Jatoi, A, Kaasa, S & Strasser, F 2014, 'Early recognition of malnutrition and cachexia in the cancer patient: A position paper of a European School of Oncology Task Force', Annals of Oncology, vol. 25, no. 8, mdu085, pp. 1492-1499. https://doi.org/10.1093/annonc/mdu085
Aapro, M. ; Arends, J. ; Bozzetti, F. ; Fearon, Ken ; Grunberg, S. M. ; Herrstedt, J. ; Hopkinson, J. ; Jacquelin-Ravel, N. ; Jatoi, Aminah ; Kaasa, S. ; Strasser, F. / Early recognition of malnutrition and cachexia in the cancer patient : A position paper of a European School of Oncology Task Force. In: Annals of Oncology. 2014 ; Vol. 25, No. 8. pp. 1492-1499.
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