Early Outcomes of Patients With Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Versus Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy: The Mayo Clinic Experience

Nathan Y. Yu, Todd A. DeWees, Chenbin Liu, Thomas B. Daniels, Jonathan B. Ashman, Staci E. Beamer, Dawn E. Jaroszewski, Helen J. Ross, Harshita R. Paripati, Jean Claude M. Rwigema, Julia X. Ding, Jie Shan, Wei Liu, Steven E. Schild, Terence T. Sio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: There are very little data available comparing outcomes of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with locally advanced NSCLC (LA-NSCLC). Methods: Seventy-nine consecutively treated patients with LA-NSCLC underwent definitive IMPT (n = 33 [42%]) or IMRT (n = 46 [58%]) from 2016 to 2018 at our institution. Survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Acute and subacute toxicities were graded based on Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.03. Results: Median follow-up was 10.5 months (range, 1-27) for all surviving patients. Most were stage III (80%), received median radiation therapy (RT) dose of 60 Gy (range, 45-72), and had concurrent chemotherapy (65%). At baseline, the IMPT cohort was older (76 vs 69 years, P <.01), were more likely to be oxygen-dependent (18 vs 2%, P =.02), and more often received reirradiation (27 vs 9%, P =.04) than their IMRT counterparts. At 1 year, the IMPT and IMRT cohorts had similar overall survival (68 vs 65%, P =.87), freedom from distant metastasis (71 vs 68%, P =.58), and freedom from locoregional recurrence (86 vs 69%, P =.11), respectively. On multivariate analyses, poorer pulmonary function and older age were associated with grade +3 toxicities during and 3 months after RT, respectively (both P ≤.02). Only 5 (15%) IMPT and 4 (9%) IMRT patients experienced grade 3 or 4 toxicities 3 months after RT (P =.47). There was 1 treatment-related death from radiation pneumonitis 6 months after IMRT in a patient with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Conclusions: Compared with IMRT, our early experience suggests that IMPT resulted in similar outcomes in a frailer population of LA-NSCLC who were more often being reirradiated. The role of IMPT remains to be defined prospectively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)450-458
Number of pages9
JournalAdvances in Radiation Oncology
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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