Early multimodality treatment of intracranial abscesses

Courtney Pendleton, George I. Jallo, Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The treatment of brain abscesses remains one of the success stories of contemporary neurosurgery; what began as a nearly uniformly fatal disease at the turn of the 20th century has become a largely curable ailment through the use of operative and pharmaceutical intervention. Methods: Following institutional review board approval, and through the courtesy of the Alan Mason Chesney Archives, the surgical files of the Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1896 to 1912, were reviewed. Results: A total of six patients were operated on for intracranial abscesses. Three patients died during their admission, the remaining three were discharged with a condition listed as "improved" or "well." Conclusions: Cushing employed a variety of operative drainage techniques for intracranial abscesses and implemented an early antibacterial agent to provide adjuvant treatment in one patient. Although these cases demonstrate a 50% mortality rate, they provide insight into the challenges faced by neurosurgeons treating intracranial abscesses at the turn of the 20th century.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)712-714
Number of pages3
JournalWorld Neurosurgery
Volume78
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Abscess
Brain Abscess
Research Ethics Committees
Neurosurgery
Drainage
Therapeutics
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Mortality
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Neurosurgeons

Keywords

  • Cushing
  • Intracranial abscess

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Early multimodality treatment of intracranial abscesses. / Pendleton, Courtney; Jallo, George I.; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo.

In: World Neurosurgery, Vol. 78, No. 6, 12.2012, p. 712-714.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Pendleton, Courtney ; Jallo, George I. ; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo. / Early multimodality treatment of intracranial abscesses. In: World Neurosurgery. 2012 ; Vol. 78, No. 6. pp. 712-714.
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