Dynamic pressure transmission through agarose gels

D. B F Saris, N. Mukherjee, L. J. Berglund, F. M. Schultz, K. N. An, S. W. O'Driscoll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In biomedical research, agarose gel is widely used in tissue culture systems because it permits growing cells and tissues in a three-dimensional suspension. This is especially important in the application of tissue engineering concepts to cartilage repair because it supports the cartilage phenotype. Mechanical loading, especially compression, plays a fundamental role in the development and repair of cartilage. It would be advantageous to develop a system where cells and tissues could be subjected to compression so that their responses can be studied. There is currently no information on the pressure response of agarose gel when pressure is applied to the gas phase of a culture system. To understand the transmission of pressure through the gel, we set up an apparatus that would mimic an agarose suspension tissue culture system. This consisted of a sealed metal cylinder containing air as well as a layer of agarose submerged in culture medium. Pressure responses were recorded in the air, fluid, gel center, and gel periphery using various frequencies, pressures, gel volumes, and viscosities. Regression analyses show an almost perfect linear relation between gas and gel pressures (r 2 = 0.99987, p < 0.0001, f(x) = 0.9982 x - 0.0286). The pressure transmission was complete and immediate, throughout the range of the applied pressures, frequencies, volumes, and viscosities tested. Applying dynamic pressure to the gas phase results in reproducible pressure in the agarose and, therefore, validates the use of agarose tissue culture systems in studies employing dynamic pressurization in cartilage tissue engineering.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)531-537
Number of pages7
JournalTissue Engineering
Volume6
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Sepharose
Gels
Pressure
Cartilage
Tissue culture
Gases
Tissue Engineering
Tissue engineering
Viscosity
Suspensions
Compaction
Repair
Air
Tissue
Pressurization
Culture Media
Biomedical Research
Metals
Regression Analysis
Phenotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Saris, D. B. F., Mukherjee, N., Berglund, L. J., Schultz, F. M., An, K. N., & O&apos;Driscoll, S. W. (2000). Dynamic pressure transmission through agarose gels. Tissue Engineering, 6(5), 531-537. https://doi.org/10.1089/107632700750022170

Dynamic pressure transmission through agarose gels. / Saris, D. B F; Mukherjee, N.; Berglund, L. J.; Schultz, F. M.; An, K. N.; O&apos;Driscoll, S. W.

In: Tissue Engineering, Vol. 6, No. 5, 2000, p. 531-537.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Saris, DBF, Mukherjee, N, Berglund, LJ, Schultz, FM, An, KN & O&apos;Driscoll, SW 2000, 'Dynamic pressure transmission through agarose gels', Tissue Engineering, vol. 6, no. 5, pp. 531-537. https://doi.org/10.1089/107632700750022170
Saris DBF, Mukherjee N, Berglund LJ, Schultz FM, An KN, O&apos;Driscoll SW. Dynamic pressure transmission through agarose gels. Tissue Engineering. 2000;6(5):531-537. https://doi.org/10.1089/107632700750022170
Saris, D. B F ; Mukherjee, N. ; Berglund, L. J. ; Schultz, F. M. ; An, K. N. ; O&apos;Driscoll, S. W. / Dynamic pressure transmission through agarose gels. In: Tissue Engineering. 2000 ; Vol. 6, No. 5. pp. 531-537.
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