Dual computer monitors to increase efficiency of conducting systematic reviews

Zhen Wang, Noor Asi, Tarig A. Elraiyah, Abd Moain Abu Dabrh, Chaitanya Undavalli, Paul Glasziou, Victor Manuel Montori, Mohammad H Murad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Systematic reviews (SRs) are the cornerstone of evidence-based medicine. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of using two computer screens on the efficiency of conducting SRs. Study Design and Setting: A cohort of reviewers before and after using dual monitors were compared with a control group that did not use dual monitors. The outcomes were time spent for abstract screening, full-text screening and data extraction, and inter-rater agreement. We adopted multivariate difference-in-differences linear regression models. Results: A total of 60 SRs conducted by 54 reviewers were included in this analysis. We found a significant reduction of 23.81 minutes per article in data extraction in the intervention group relative to the control group (95% confidence interval: -46.03, -1.58, P = 0.04), which was a 36.85% reduction in time. There was no significant difference in time spent on abstract screening, full-text screening, or inter-rater agreement between the two groups. Conclusion: Using dual monitors when conducting SRs is associated with significant reduction of time spent on data extraction. No significant difference was observed on time spent on abstract screening or full-text screening. Using dual monitors is one strategy that may improve the efficiency of conducting SRs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1353-1357
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume67
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

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Linear Models
Control Groups
Evidence-Based Medicine
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • Efficiency
  • Evidence-based medicine
  • Research design
  • Systematic reviews
  • Technology
  • Validity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Dual computer monitors to increase efficiency of conducting systematic reviews. / Wang, Zhen; Asi, Noor; Elraiyah, Tarig A.; Abu Dabrh, Abd Moain; Undavalli, Chaitanya; Glasziou, Paul; Montori, Victor Manuel; Murad, Mohammad H.

In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Vol. 67, No. 12, 01.12.2014, p. 1353-1357.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Glasziou, Paul

AU - Montori, Victor Manuel

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