Drug prescribing trends in adults with rheumatoid arthritis: a population-based comparative study from 2005 to 2014

Jorge A. Zamora-Legoff, Elena Myasoedova, Eric Lawrence Matteson, Sara J. Achenbach, Cynthia Crowson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine drug prescribing trends for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) over recent years and compare them to matched non-RA subjects. Retrospective prescription data were examined from 2005 to 2014 in a population-based incidence cohort of patients with RA and comparable non-RA subjects. Drugs for or related to the treatment of RA were excluded. Comparisons between cohorts of percentages of patients with at least one prescription in a specific drug category/class were performed using Poisson regression models adjusted for age and sex. The study included 497 RA (71 % female) and 527 non-RA subjects (70 % female). The overall observed percentage of subjects who were prescribed at least one drug over the 10-year period was somewhat higher among the RA compared to non-RA subjects (relative risk [RR], 1.04; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 0.99, 1.08). Over the study period, both groups demonstrated significant increases in the percentages of patients with at least one prescription (age- and sex-adjusted 7 % increase over 10 years in RA, p < 0.001; 11 % increase in non-RA, p < 0.001). Drugs that were more common among RA than non-RA included gastrointestinal drugs, antimicrobials, calcium metabolism modifiers, thyroid hormone replacement therapy, tricyclic antidepressants, antiasthma/inhaled corticosteroids, proton pump inhibitors, contraceptives, antihypertensives, and some others. Prescription drugs that were less common in RA than non-RA were statins and other antilipemic drugs. Excluding drug prescriptions specifically for treatment of RA, there was a marked overall increase in prescriptions for drugs for both RA and non-RA cohorts over the study period.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Rheumatology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 22 2016

Fingerprint

Drug Prescriptions
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Arthritis
Population
Prescriptions
Prescription Drugs
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Gastrointestinal Agents
Hypolipidemic Agents
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Proton Pump Inhibitors
Tricyclic Antidepressive Agents
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Contraceptive Agents
Thyroid Hormones
Antihypertensive Agents
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Calcium

Keywords

  • Drug use
  • Prescription patterns
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Statins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Drug prescribing trends in adults with rheumatoid arthritis : a population-based comparative study from 2005 to 2014. / Zamora-Legoff, Jorge A.; Myasoedova, Elena; Matteson, Eric Lawrence; Achenbach, Sara J.; Crowson, Cynthia.

In: Clinical Rheumatology, 22.06.2016, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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