Driving and epilepsy

Joseph I. Sirven

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

A 41-year-old female pilot for a major airline presented with subacute worsening of brief events of involuntary stereotyped motor movements. The episodes began 3 years ago and until recently were sporadic. They consisted of an abrupt onset of left arm posturing with elevation toward her face and "smacking her lips". At the same time she reported that her left face would draw upward associated with a transient inability to verbally respond to questions. The episodes were several seconds in duration and occurred three times daily on average. She reported that they were so brief that they did not impact her cognition or impair her overall ability to function. Worsening began following a long airplane flight where she had been sleep-deprived due to a busy and difficult work schedule causing them to occur several times an hour. Her general and neurological examination was normal. An MRI was obtained and was found to be normal. A serum drug screen and laboratory was unrevealing. An EEG was subsequently obtained and captured an episode (Fig. 21.1).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEpilepsy Case Studies: Pearls for Patient Care
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages95-98
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9783319013664, 3319013653, 9783319013657
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

Fingerprint

Epilepsy
Aptitude
Aircraft
Neurologic Examination
Lip
Cognition
Electroencephalography
Appointments and Schedules
Sleep
Arm
Serum
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sirven, J. I. (2013). Driving and epilepsy. In Epilepsy Case Studies: Pearls for Patient Care (pp. 95-98). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-01366-4_21

Driving and epilepsy. / Sirven, Joseph I.

Epilepsy Case Studies: Pearls for Patient Care. Springer International Publishing, 2013. p. 95-98.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Sirven, JI 2013, Driving and epilepsy. in Epilepsy Case Studies: Pearls for Patient Care. Springer International Publishing, pp. 95-98. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-01366-4_21
Sirven JI. Driving and epilepsy. In Epilepsy Case Studies: Pearls for Patient Care. Springer International Publishing. 2013. p. 95-98 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-01366-4_21
Sirven, Joseph I. / Driving and epilepsy. Epilepsy Case Studies: Pearls for Patient Care. Springer International Publishing, 2013. pp. 95-98
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