Drinking Water Source and Mortality in US Cities

Michele M. Morin, A. Richey Sharrett, Kent R Bailey, Richard R. Fabsitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Morin M M (Epidemiology and Biostatistics Program, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20205, USA), Sharrett A R, Bailey K R and Fabsrtz R R. Drinking water source and mortality in US cities. International Journal of Epidemiology 1985, 14: 254–264. An apparent excess risk of all-cancer mortality among 473 of the largest US cities was found in relation to surface drinking water supplies. The increased risk for 100% surface water versus 100% ground water use was slight, about 2%, but statistically significant. This finding agrees with reports from several earlier studies in smaller geographical regions of the US, Great Britain and Canada. A relationship was further supported by the replication of this association within the larger of the 11 independent regions studied. Our data suggest that the association with surface water may be specific to cancer mortality. The increased risk would be expected to be greater than 2% if analyses were restricted to cancers of sites previously related to the use of surface drinking water.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)254-264
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Epidemiology
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1985
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Drinking Water
Mortality
Epidemiology
Biostatistics
Neoplasms
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Water
Water Supply
Groundwater
Canada
morin
United Kingdom

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Drinking Water Source and Mortality in US Cities. / Morin, Michele M.; Sharrett, A. Richey; Bailey, Kent R; Fabsitz, Richard R.

In: International Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 14, No. 2, 1985, p. 254-264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Morin, Michele M. ; Sharrett, A. Richey ; Bailey, Kent R ; Fabsitz, Richard R. / Drinking Water Source and Mortality in US Cities. In: International Journal of Epidemiology. 1985 ; Vol. 14, No. 2. pp. 254-264.
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