Does loading velocity affect failure strength after tendon repair?

Manoj Parimi, Chunfeng Zhao, Andrew R. Thoreson, Kai Nan An, Peter C. Amadio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Tensile testing of repaired tendons has been used to assess the efficacy of repair techniques. However, individuals flex and extend fingers at rates higher than those typically used for testing. This study characterized the effect of loading rate on the failure strength of repaired canine flexor tendons. Thirty-six canine flexor digitorum profundus tendons were lacerated, repaired, and tested at three displacement rates: 0.33. mm/s; 84. mm/s; and 590. mm/s. Peak force and stiffness of the repairs were evaluated. Peak force was significantly greater (p<0.05) for tendons distracted at 590. mm/s than at 0.33. mm/s. Crosshead stiffness was significantly greater for tendons distracted at 590. mm/s than at either 84. mm/s or 0.33. mm/s. The predominant failure mode was core suture knot untying. Distracting tendons at slow loading rates provides a conservative assessment of tendon repair strength. Additionally, an estimate of the failure load of this repair for different clinical events has been identified.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2939-2942
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Biomechanics
Volume45
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2012

Keywords

  • Kinematics
  • Mechanical testing
  • Rate dependence
  • Suture
  • Tendon repair

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Rehabilitation

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