Does emotional intelligence change during medical school gross anatomy course? Correlations with students' performance and team cohesion

Michelle A. Holman, Samuel G. Porter, Wojciech Pawlina, Justin E. Juskewitch, Nirusha Lachman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Emotional intelligence (EI) has been associated with increased academic achievement, but its impact on medical education is relatively unexplored. This study sought to evaluate change in EI, performance outcomes, and team cohesion within a team-based medical school anatomy course. Forty-two medical students completed a pre-course and post-course Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence Test (SSEIT). Individual EI scores were then compared with composite course performance grade and team cohesion survey results. Mean pre-course EI score was 140.3 out of a possible 160. During the course, mean individual EI scores did not change significantly (P = 0.17) and no correlation between EI scores and academic performance was noted (P = 0.31). In addition, EI did not correlate with team cohesion (P = 0.16). While business has found significant utility for EI in increasing performance and productivity, its role in medical education is still uncertain. Anat Sci Educ 9: 143-149.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-149
Number of pages7
JournalAnatomical Sciences Education
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Keywords

  • Emotional intelligence
  • Gross anatomy education
  • Medical education
  • Student performance
  • Team cohesion
  • Team-based learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Histology
  • Embryology

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