Doctors' handwriting gone digital: An ethical assessment of voice recognition technology in medicine

William P. Cheshire

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The pen, once the instrument of clinical documentation, is yielding to the more efficient technology of computer-assisted voice recognition. With this transition, in place of the quirky handwriting that has long characterized medical practice, electronic medical documents supply readable and detailed, yet imperfect, text. Technology has not fully solved the problem of medical error but has, in some ways, magnified it. The ethical dimensions of physician-to-computer communication raise questions regarding moral responsibility at the interface of mind and machine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-77
Number of pages7
JournalEthics and Medicine
Volume29
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 2013

Fingerprint

Handwriting
Medical Electronics
Medicine
Technology
Medical Errors
Documentation
Communication
Physicians
Doctors
Moral Responsibility
Medical Practice
Imperfect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Philosophy
  • Religious studies

Cite this

Doctors' handwriting gone digital : An ethical assessment of voice recognition technology in medicine. / Cheshire, William P.

In: Ethics and Medicine, Vol. 29, No. 2, 06.2013, p. 71-77.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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