Do attending physicians, nurses, residents, and medical students agree on what constitutes medical student abuse?

Paul E. Ogden, Edward H. Wu, Michael D. Elnicki, Michael J. Battistone, Lynn M. Cleary, Mark J. Fagan, Erica Friedman, Peter M. Gliatto, Heather E. Harrell, May S. Jennings, Cynthia H. Ledford, Alex J. Mechaber, Matthew Mintz, Kevin O'Brien, Matthew R. Thomas, Raymond Y. Wong

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Whether attending physicians, residents, nurses, and medical students agree on what constitutes medical student abuse, its severity, or influencing factors is unknown. Method: We surveyed 237 internal medicine attending physicians, residents, medical students, and nurses at 13 medical schools after viewing five vignettes depicting potentially abusive behaviors. Results: The majority of each group felt the belittlement, ethnic insensitivity, and sexual harassment scenarios represented abuse but that excluding a student from participating in a procedure did not. Only a majority of attending physicians considered the negative feedback scenario as abuse. Medical students rated abuse severity significantly lower than other groups in the belittlement scenario (p < .05). Respondents who felt abused as students were more likely to rate behaviors as abusive (p < .05). Conclusions: The groups generally agree on what constitutes abuse, but attending physicians and those abused as students may perceive more behaviors as abusive.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume80
Issue number10 SUPPL.
StatePublished - Oct 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Medical Students
medical student
abuse
nurse
Nurses
physician
resident
Physicians
Students
scenario
Sexual Harassment
Internal Medicine
Medical Schools
Group
student
sexual harassment
medicine
school

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Education

Cite this

Ogden, P. E., Wu, E. H., Elnicki, M. D., Battistone, M. J., Cleary, L. M., Fagan, M. J., ... Wong, R. Y. (2005). Do attending physicians, nurses, residents, and medical students agree on what constitutes medical student abuse? Academic Medicine, 80(10 SUPPL.).

Do attending physicians, nurses, residents, and medical students agree on what constitutes medical student abuse? / Ogden, Paul E.; Wu, Edward H.; Elnicki, Michael D.; Battistone, Michael J.; Cleary, Lynn M.; Fagan, Mark J.; Friedman, Erica; Gliatto, Peter M.; Harrell, Heather E.; Jennings, May S.; Ledford, Cynthia H.; Mechaber, Alex J.; Mintz, Matthew; O'Brien, Kevin; Thomas, Matthew R.; Wong, Raymond Y.

In: Academic Medicine, Vol. 80, No. 10 SUPPL., 10.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Ogden, PE, Wu, EH, Elnicki, MD, Battistone, MJ, Cleary, LM, Fagan, MJ, Friedman, E, Gliatto, PM, Harrell, HE, Jennings, MS, Ledford, CH, Mechaber, AJ, Mintz, M, O'Brien, K, Thomas, MR & Wong, RY 2005, 'Do attending physicians, nurses, residents, and medical students agree on what constitutes medical student abuse?', Academic Medicine, vol. 80, no. 10 SUPPL..
Ogden PE, Wu EH, Elnicki MD, Battistone MJ, Cleary LM, Fagan MJ et al. Do attending physicians, nurses, residents, and medical students agree on what constitutes medical student abuse? Academic Medicine. 2005 Oct;80(10 SUPPL.).
Ogden, Paul E. ; Wu, Edward H. ; Elnicki, Michael D. ; Battistone, Michael J. ; Cleary, Lynn M. ; Fagan, Mark J. ; Friedman, Erica ; Gliatto, Peter M. ; Harrell, Heather E. ; Jennings, May S. ; Ledford, Cynthia H. ; Mechaber, Alex J. ; Mintz, Matthew ; O'Brien, Kevin ; Thomas, Matthew R. ; Wong, Raymond Y. / Do attending physicians, nurses, residents, and medical students agree on what constitutes medical student abuse?. In: Academic Medicine. 2005 ; Vol. 80, No. 10 SUPPL.
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abstract = "Background: Whether attending physicians, residents, nurses, and medical students agree on what constitutes medical student abuse, its severity, or influencing factors is unknown. Method: We surveyed 237 internal medicine attending physicians, residents, medical students, and nurses at 13 medical schools after viewing five vignettes depicting potentially abusive behaviors. Results: The majority of each group felt the belittlement, ethnic insensitivity, and sexual harassment scenarios represented abuse but that excluding a student from participating in a procedure did not. Only a majority of attending physicians considered the negative feedback scenario as abuse. Medical students rated abuse severity significantly lower than other groups in the belittlement scenario (p < .05). Respondents who felt abused as students were more likely to rate behaviors as abusive (p < .05). Conclusions: The groups generally agree on what constitutes abuse, but attending physicians and those abused as students may perceive more behaviors as abusive.",
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