DNA triple-helix formation: An approach to artificial gene repressors?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

89 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Certain sequences of double-helical DNA can be recognized and tightly bound by oligonucleotides. The effects of such triple-helical structures on DNA binding proteins have been studied. Stabilities of DNA triple-helices at or near physiological conditions are sufficient to inhibit DNA binding proteins directed to overlapping sites. Such proteins include restriction endonucleases, methylases, transcription factors, and RNA polymerases. These and other results suggest that oligonucleotide-directed triple-helix formation could provide the basis for designing artificial gene repressors. The general question of whether biological systems employ RNA molecules for recognition and regulation of double-helical DNA is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)807-815
Number of pages9
JournalBioEssays
Volume14
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Synthetic Genes
synthetic genes
DNA-binding proteins
Genes
DNA-Binding Proteins
oligonucleotides
Oligonucleotides
DNA
DNA Restriction Enzymes
restriction endonucleases
Biological systems
DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases
DNA-directed RNA polymerase
Transcription Factors
transcription factors
RNA
Molecules
Proteins
proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Plant Science
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)

Cite this

DNA triple-helix formation : An approach to artificial gene repressors? / Maher III, L James.

In: BioEssays, Vol. 14, No. 12, 12.1992, p. 807-815.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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