Distribution of arterial lesions in Takayasu's arteritis and giant cell arteritis

Peter C. Grayson, Kathleen Maksimowicz-McKinnon, Tiffany M. Clark, Gunnar Tomasson, David Cuthbertson, Simon Carette, Nader A. Khalidi, Carol A. Langford, Paul A. Monach, Philip Seo, Kenneth J Warrington, Steven R Ytterberg, Gary S. Hoffman, Peter A. Merkel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

136 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To compare patterns of arteriographic lesions of the aorta and primary branches in patients with Takayasu's arteritis (TAK) and giant cell arteritis (GCA). Methods: Patients were selected from two North American cohorts of TAK and GCA. The frequency of arteriographic lesions was calculated for 15 large arteries. Cluster analysis was used to derive patterns of arterial disease in TAK versus GCA and in patients categorised by age at disease onset. Using latent class analysis, computer derived classification models based upon patterns of arterial disease were compared with traditional classification. Results: Arteriographic lesions were identified in 145 patients with TAK and 62 patients with GCA. Cluster analysis demonstrated that arterial involvement was contiguous in the aorta and usually symmetric in paired branch vessels for TAK and GCA. There was significantly more left carotid (p=0.03) and mesenteric (p=0.02) artery disease in TAK and more left and right axillary (p<0.01) artery disease in GCA. Subclavian disease clustered asymmetrically in TAK and in patients ≤55 years at disease onset and clustered symmetrically in GCA and patients >55 years at disease onset. Computer derived classification models distinguished TAK from GCA in two subgroups, defining 26% and 18% of the study sample; however, 56% of patients were classified into a subgroup that did not strongly differentiate between TAK and GCA. Conclusions: Strong similarities and subtle differences in the distribution of arterial disease were observed between TAK and GCA. These findings suggest that TAK and GCA may exist on a spectrum within the same disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1329-1334
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of the Rheumatic Diseases
Volume71
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2012

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Takayasu Arteritis
Giant Cell Arteritis
Cluster analysis
Cluster Analysis
Aorta
Arteries
Age of Onset

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Grayson, P. C., Maksimowicz-McKinnon, K., Clark, T. M., Tomasson, G., Cuthbertson, D., Carette, S., ... Merkel, P. A. (2012). Distribution of arterial lesions in Takayasu's arteritis and giant cell arteritis. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 71(8), 1329-1334. https://doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2011-200795

Distribution of arterial lesions in Takayasu's arteritis and giant cell arteritis. / Grayson, Peter C.; Maksimowicz-McKinnon, Kathleen; Clark, Tiffany M.; Tomasson, Gunnar; Cuthbertson, David; Carette, Simon; Khalidi, Nader A.; Langford, Carol A.; Monach, Paul A.; Seo, Philip; Warrington, Kenneth J; Ytterberg, Steven R; Hoffman, Gary S.; Merkel, Peter A.

In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, Vol. 71, No. 8, 08.2012, p. 1329-1334.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grayson, PC, Maksimowicz-McKinnon, K, Clark, TM, Tomasson, G, Cuthbertson, D, Carette, S, Khalidi, NA, Langford, CA, Monach, PA, Seo, P, Warrington, KJ, Ytterberg, SR, Hoffman, GS & Merkel, PA 2012, 'Distribution of arterial lesions in Takayasu's arteritis and giant cell arteritis', Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, vol. 71, no. 8, pp. 1329-1334. https://doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2011-200795
Grayson PC, Maksimowicz-McKinnon K, Clark TM, Tomasson G, Cuthbertson D, Carette S et al. Distribution of arterial lesions in Takayasu's arteritis and giant cell arteritis. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases. 2012 Aug;71(8):1329-1334. https://doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2011-200795
Grayson, Peter C. ; Maksimowicz-McKinnon, Kathleen ; Clark, Tiffany M. ; Tomasson, Gunnar ; Cuthbertson, David ; Carette, Simon ; Khalidi, Nader A. ; Langford, Carol A. ; Monach, Paul A. ; Seo, Philip ; Warrington, Kenneth J ; Ytterberg, Steven R ; Hoffman, Gary S. ; Merkel, Peter A. / Distribution of arterial lesions in Takayasu's arteritis and giant cell arteritis. In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases. 2012 ; Vol. 71, No. 8. pp. 1329-1334.
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abstract = "Objectives: To compare patterns of arteriographic lesions of the aorta and primary branches in patients with Takayasu's arteritis (TAK) and giant cell arteritis (GCA). Methods: Patients were selected from two North American cohorts of TAK and GCA. The frequency of arteriographic lesions was calculated for 15 large arteries. Cluster analysis was used to derive patterns of arterial disease in TAK versus GCA and in patients categorised by age at disease onset. Using latent class analysis, computer derived classification models based upon patterns of arterial disease were compared with traditional classification. Results: Arteriographic lesions were identified in 145 patients with TAK and 62 patients with GCA. Cluster analysis demonstrated that arterial involvement was contiguous in the aorta and usually symmetric in paired branch vessels for TAK and GCA. There was significantly more left carotid (p=0.03) and mesenteric (p=0.02) artery disease in TAK and more left and right axillary (p<0.01) artery disease in GCA. Subclavian disease clustered asymmetrically in TAK and in patients ≤55 years at disease onset and clustered symmetrically in GCA and patients >55 years at disease onset. Computer derived classification models distinguished TAK from GCA in two subgroups, defining 26{\%} and 18{\%} of the study sample; however, 56{\%} of patients were classified into a subgroup that did not strongly differentiate between TAK and GCA. Conclusions: Strong similarities and subtle differences in the distribution of arterial disease were observed between TAK and GCA. These findings suggest that TAK and GCA may exist on a spectrum within the same disease.",
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AU - Cuthbertson, David

AU - Carette, Simon

AU - Khalidi, Nader A.

AU - Langford, Carol A.

AU - Monach, Paul A.

AU - Seo, Philip

AU - Warrington, Kenneth J

AU - Ytterberg, Steven R

AU - Hoffman, Gary S.

AU - Merkel, Peter A.

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