Distinct regional anatomic and functional correlates of neurodegenerative apraxia of speech and aphasia: An MRI and FDG-PET study

Jennifer L. Whitwell, Joseph R. Duffy, Edythe A. Strand, Rong Xia, Jay Mandrekar, Mary M. Machulda, Matthew L. Senjem, Val J. Lowe, Clifford R. Jack, Keith A. Josephs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

48 Scopus citations

Abstract

Progressive apraxia of speech (AOS) can result from neurodegenerative disease and can occur in isolation or in the presence of agrammatic aphasia. We aimed to determine the neuroanatomical and metabolic correlates of progressive AOS and aphasia. Thirty-six prospectively recruited subjects with progressive AOS or agrammatic aphasia, or both, underwent the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) and Token Test to assess aphasia, an AOS rating scale (ASRS), 3T MRI and 18-F fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET. Correlations between clinical measures and imaging were assessed. The only region that correlated to ASRS was left superior premotor volume. In contrast, WAB and Token Test correlated with hypometabolism and volume of a network of left hemisphere regions, including pars triangularis, pars opercularis, pars orbitalis, middle frontal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, precentral gyrus and inferior parietal lobe. Progressive agrammatic aphasia and AOS have non-overlapping regional correlations, suggesting that these are dissociable clinical features that have different neuroanatomical underpinnings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)245-252
Number of pages8
JournalBrain and Language
Volume125
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013

Keywords

  • Aphasia
  • Apraxia of speech
  • Atrophy
  • Broca's area
  • Hypometabolism
  • Premotor cortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Speech and Hearing

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