Disruptions in surgical flow and their relationship to surgical errors

An exploratory investigation

Douglas A. Wiegmann, Andrew W. ElBardissi, Joseph A. Dearani, Richard C. Daly, Thoralf M. Sundt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

276 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Disruptions in surgical flow have the potential to increase the occurrence of surgical errors; however, little is known about the frequency and nature of surgical flow disruptions and their effect on the etiology of errors, which makes the development of evidence-based interventions extremely difficult. The goal of this project was to study surgical errors and their relationship to surgical flow disruptions in cardiovascular surgery prospectively to understand better the effect of these disruptions on surgical errors and ultimately patient safety. Methods: A trained observer recorded surgical errors and flow disruptions during 31 cardiac surgery operations over a 3-week period and categorized them by a classification system of human factors. Flow disruptions were then reviewed and analyzed by an interdisciplinary team of experts in operative and human factors. Results: Flow disruptions consisted of teamwork/communication failures, equipment and technology problems, extraneous interruptions, training-related distractions, and issues in resource accessibility. Surgical errors increased significantly with increases in flow disruptions. Teamwork/communication failures were the strongest predictor of surgical errors. Conclusion: These findings provide preliminary data to develop evidenced-based error management and patient safety programs within cardiac surgery with implications to other related surgical programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)658-665
Number of pages8
JournalSurgery
Volume142
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2007

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Medical Errors
Patient Safety
Thoracic Surgery
Communication
Equipment Failure
Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Wiegmann, D. A., ElBardissi, A. W., Dearani, J. A., Daly, R. C., & Sundt, T. M. (2007). Disruptions in surgical flow and their relationship to surgical errors: An exploratory investigation. Surgery, 142(5), 658-665. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.surg.2007.07.034

Disruptions in surgical flow and their relationship to surgical errors : An exploratory investigation. / Wiegmann, Douglas A.; ElBardissi, Andrew W.; Dearani, Joseph A.; Daly, Richard C.; Sundt, Thoralf M.

In: Surgery, Vol. 142, No. 5, 11.2007, p. 658-665.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wiegmann, DA, ElBardissi, AW, Dearani, JA, Daly, RC & Sundt, TM 2007, 'Disruptions in surgical flow and their relationship to surgical errors: An exploratory investigation', Surgery, vol. 142, no. 5, pp. 658-665. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.surg.2007.07.034
Wiegmann, Douglas A. ; ElBardissi, Andrew W. ; Dearani, Joseph A. ; Daly, Richard C. ; Sundt, Thoralf M. / Disruptions in surgical flow and their relationship to surgical errors : An exploratory investigation. In: Surgery. 2007 ; Vol. 142, No. 5. pp. 658-665.
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