Disease and outcome disparities in multiple myeloma: Exploring the role of race/ethnicity in the Cooperative Group clinical trials

Sikander Ailawadhi, Susanna Jacobus, Rachael Sexton, Alexander Keith Stewart, Angela Dispenzieri, Mohamad A. Hussein, Jeffrey A. Zonder, John Crowley, Antje Hoering, Bart Barlogie, Robert Z. Orlowski, S Vincent Rajkumar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable hematologic malignancy with disparities in outcomes noted among racial-ethnic subgroups, likely due to disparities in access to effective treatment modalities. Clinical trials can provide access to evidence-based medicine but representation of minorities on therapeutic clinical trials has been dismal. We evaluated the impact of patient race-ethnicity in pooled data from nine large national cooperative group clinical trials in newly diagnosed MM. Among 2896 patients enrolled over more than two decades, only 18% were non-White and enrollment of minorities actually decreased in most recent years (2002-2011). African-Americans were younger and had more frequent poor-risk markers, including anemia and increased lactate dehydrogenase. Hispanics had the smallest proportion of patients on trials utilizing novel therapeutic agents. While adverse demographic (increased age) and clinical (performance status, stage, anemia, kidney dysfunction) factors were associated with inferior survival, patient race-ethnicity did not have an effect on objective response rates, progression-free, or overall survival. While there are significant disparities in MM incidence and outcomes among patients of different racial-ethnic groups, this disparity seems to be mitigated by access to appropriate therapeutic options, for example, as offered by clinical trials. Improved minority accrual in therapeutic clinical trials needs to be a priority.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number67
JournalBlood Cancer Journal
Volume8
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018

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Multiple Myeloma
Clinical Trials
Anemia
Therapeutics
Survival
Evidence-Based Medicine
Hematologic Neoplasms
L-Lactate Dehydrogenase
Hispanic Americans
Ethnic Groups
African Americans
Demography
Kidney
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Disease and outcome disparities in multiple myeloma : Exploring the role of race/ethnicity in the Cooperative Group clinical trials. / Ailawadhi, Sikander; Jacobus, Susanna; Sexton, Rachael; Stewart, Alexander Keith; Dispenzieri, Angela; Hussein, Mohamad A.; Zonder, Jeffrey A.; Crowley, John; Hoering, Antje; Barlogie, Bart; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Rajkumar, S Vincent.

In: Blood Cancer Journal, Vol. 8, No. 7, 67, 01.07.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ailawadhi, Sikander ; Jacobus, Susanna ; Sexton, Rachael ; Stewart, Alexander Keith ; Dispenzieri, Angela ; Hussein, Mohamad A. ; Zonder, Jeffrey A. ; Crowley, John ; Hoering, Antje ; Barlogie, Bart ; Orlowski, Robert Z. ; Rajkumar, S Vincent. / Disease and outcome disparities in multiple myeloma : Exploring the role of race/ethnicity in the Cooperative Group clinical trials. In: Blood Cancer Journal. 2018 ; Vol. 8, No. 7.
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