Direct visualization of deep brain stimulation targets in Parkinson disease with the use of 7-tesla magnetic resonance imaging: Clinical article

Zang Hee Cho, Hoon Ki Min, Se Hong Oh, Jae Yong Han, Chan Woong Park, Je Geun Chi, Young Bo Kim, Sun Ha Paek, Andres M. Lozano, Kendall H. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

118 Scopus citations

Abstract

Object. A challenge associated with deep brain stimulation (DBS) in treating advanced Parkinson disease (PD) is the direct visualization of brain nuclei, which often involves indirect approximations of stereotactic targets. In the present study, the authors compared T2*-weighted images obtained using 7-T MR imaging with those obtained using 1.5- and 3-T MR imaging to ascertain whether 7-T imaging enables better visualization of targets for DBS in PD. Methods. The authors compared 1.5-, 3-, and 7-T MR images obtained in 11 healthy volunteers and 1 patient with PD. Results. With 7-T imaging, distinct images of the brain were obtained, including the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and internal globus pallidus (GPi). Compared with the 1.5- and 3-T MR images of the STN and GPi, the 7-T MR images showed marked improvements in spatial resolution, tissue contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio. Conclusions. Data in this study reveal the superiority of 7-T MR imaging for visualizing structures targeted for DBS in the management of PD. This finding suggests that by enabling the direct visualization of neural structures of interest, 7-T MR imaging could be a valuable aid in neurosurgical procedures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)639-647
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of neurosurgery
Volume113
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

Keywords

  • 7-tesla magnetic resonance imaging
  • Deep brain stimulation
  • Internal globus pallidus
  • Parkinson disease
  • Subthalamic nucleus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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