Direct translumbar inferior vena cava ports for long-term central venous access in patients with cancer

Selim R. Butros, T. Gregory Walker, Gloria M. Salazar, Sanjeeva P. Kalva, Rahmi Oklu, Stephan Wicky, Suvranu Ganguli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose To evaluate the indications, complications, and long-term results of translumbar port placements to the inferior vena cava for long-term central venous access in a single tertiary center. Materials and Methods This retrospective study included all patients with cancer who underwent translumbar port placement from January 2000 to July 2012; 31 patients (all women) with an average age of 53.1 years ± 11.1 (range, 30-77 y) were included in the study. Of these patients, 26 (81%) had breast cancer, 3 had lung cancer, 1 had ovarian cancer, and 1 had rectal cancer. Indications included central venous occlusion in 9 patients (29%) and bilateral mastectomy and lymph node dissection in 22 patients (71%). Results All procedures were technically successful. The overall 30-day complication rate was 9.7% (n = 3). Average catheter use was 14.1 months ± 21 (range, 0.75-108 mo). Thirteen (41.9%) ports were removed because they were no longer needed; 4 (12.9%) ports required removal for port malfunction; 12 (38.7%) patients died with their ports still in place; 2 (6.5%) ports remain in use. Three (9.7%) ports required delayed secondary intervention to remain functional. One patient had a systemic infection attributed to the port, resulting in an overall infection rate of 0.08 per 1,000 catheter days. Conclusions Translumbar inferior vena cava port placement is a technically feasible and safe alternative method for long-term central venous access.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)556-560
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Inferior Vena Cava
Neoplasms
Catheters
Mastectomy
Rectal Neoplasms
Infection
Lymph Node Excision
Ovarian Neoplasms
Lung Neoplasms
Retrospective Studies

Keywords

  • Abbreviation
  • inferior vena cava
  • IVC

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Direct translumbar inferior vena cava ports for long-term central venous access in patients with cancer. / Butros, Selim R.; Walker, T. Gregory; Salazar, Gloria M.; Kalva, Sanjeeva P.; Oklu, Rahmi; Wicky, Stephan; Ganguli, Suvranu.

In: Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Vol. 25, No. 4, 2014, p. 556-560.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Butros, Selim R. ; Walker, T. Gregory ; Salazar, Gloria M. ; Kalva, Sanjeeva P. ; Oklu, Rahmi ; Wicky, Stephan ; Ganguli, Suvranu. / Direct translumbar inferior vena cava ports for long-term central venous access in patients with cancer. In: Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology. 2014 ; Vol. 25, No. 4. pp. 556-560.
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abstract = "Purpose To evaluate the indications, complications, and long-term results of translumbar port placements to the inferior vena cava for long-term central venous access in a single tertiary center. Materials and Methods This retrospective study included all patients with cancer who underwent translumbar port placement from January 2000 to July 2012; 31 patients (all women) with an average age of 53.1 years ± 11.1 (range, 30-77 y) were included in the study. Of these patients, 26 (81{\%}) had breast cancer, 3 had lung cancer, 1 had ovarian cancer, and 1 had rectal cancer. Indications included central venous occlusion in 9 patients (29{\%}) and bilateral mastectomy and lymph node dissection in 22 patients (71{\%}). Results All procedures were technically successful. The overall 30-day complication rate was 9.7{\%} (n = 3). Average catheter use was 14.1 months ± 21 (range, 0.75-108 mo). Thirteen (41.9{\%}) ports were removed because they were no longer needed; 4 (12.9{\%}) ports required removal for port malfunction; 12 (38.7{\%}) patients died with their ports still in place; 2 (6.5{\%}) ports remain in use. Three (9.7{\%}) ports required delayed secondary intervention to remain functional. One patient had a systemic infection attributed to the port, resulting in an overall infection rate of 0.08 per 1,000 catheter days. Conclusions Translumbar inferior vena cava port placement is a technically feasible and safe alternative method for long-term central venous access.",
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AU - Wicky, Stephan

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N2 - Purpose To evaluate the indications, complications, and long-term results of translumbar port placements to the inferior vena cava for long-term central venous access in a single tertiary center. Materials and Methods This retrospective study included all patients with cancer who underwent translumbar port placement from January 2000 to July 2012; 31 patients (all women) with an average age of 53.1 years ± 11.1 (range, 30-77 y) were included in the study. Of these patients, 26 (81%) had breast cancer, 3 had lung cancer, 1 had ovarian cancer, and 1 had rectal cancer. Indications included central venous occlusion in 9 patients (29%) and bilateral mastectomy and lymph node dissection in 22 patients (71%). Results All procedures were technically successful. The overall 30-day complication rate was 9.7% (n = 3). Average catheter use was 14.1 months ± 21 (range, 0.75-108 mo). Thirteen (41.9%) ports were removed because they were no longer needed; 4 (12.9%) ports required removal for port malfunction; 12 (38.7%) patients died with their ports still in place; 2 (6.5%) ports remain in use. Three (9.7%) ports required delayed secondary intervention to remain functional. One patient had a systemic infection attributed to the port, resulting in an overall infection rate of 0.08 per 1,000 catheter days. Conclusions Translumbar inferior vena cava port placement is a technically feasible and safe alternative method for long-term central venous access.

AB - Purpose To evaluate the indications, complications, and long-term results of translumbar port placements to the inferior vena cava for long-term central venous access in a single tertiary center. Materials and Methods This retrospective study included all patients with cancer who underwent translumbar port placement from January 2000 to July 2012; 31 patients (all women) with an average age of 53.1 years ± 11.1 (range, 30-77 y) were included in the study. Of these patients, 26 (81%) had breast cancer, 3 had lung cancer, 1 had ovarian cancer, and 1 had rectal cancer. Indications included central venous occlusion in 9 patients (29%) and bilateral mastectomy and lymph node dissection in 22 patients (71%). Results All procedures were technically successful. The overall 30-day complication rate was 9.7% (n = 3). Average catheter use was 14.1 months ± 21 (range, 0.75-108 mo). Thirteen (41.9%) ports were removed because they were no longer needed; 4 (12.9%) ports required removal for port malfunction; 12 (38.7%) patients died with their ports still in place; 2 (6.5%) ports remain in use. Three (9.7%) ports required delayed secondary intervention to remain functional. One patient had a systemic infection attributed to the port, resulting in an overall infection rate of 0.08 per 1,000 catheter days. Conclusions Translumbar inferior vena cava port placement is a technically feasible and safe alternative method for long-term central venous access.

KW - Abbreviation

KW - inferior vena cava

KW - IVC

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