Direct adenoviral gene transfer of viral IL-10 to rabbit knees with experimental arthritis ameliorates disease in both injected and contralateral control knees

Eric R. Lechman, Daniel Jaffurs, Steven C. Ghivizzani, Andrea Gambotto, Imre Kovesdi, Zhibao Mi, Christopher H. Evans, Paul D. Robbins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

128 Scopus citations

Abstract

IL-10, a cytokine produced primarily by macrophages, B lymphocytes, and Th2 cells, has both immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive properties. A homologue of IL-10 encoded by EBV, known as viral IL-10 (vIL-10), is also able to suppress the immune response, but may lack some of the immunostimulatory properties of IL-10. To evaluate the potential of vIL-10 to block the progression of rheumatoid arthritis, we have utilized a replication-defective adenovirus vector to deliver the gene encoding vIL-10 to the knee joints of rabbits with Ag-induced arthritis. Intraarticular expression of vIL-10 significantly reduced leukocytosis, cartilage matrix degradation, and levels of endogenous rabbit TNF-α, as well as the degree of synovitis, while maintaining high levels of cartilage matrix synthesis. Interestingly, an antiarthritic effect was also observed in opposing contralateral control knee joints that received only a marker gene. An adenoviral vector carrying the enhanced green fluorescent protein marker gene was used to demonstrate that a morphologically similar subset of cells infected in the injected knee joint are able to traffic to the uninjected contralateral knee joint. Our results suggest that direct, local intraarticular delivery of the vIL-10 gene may have polyarticular therapeutic effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2202-2208
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume163
Issue number4
StatePublished - Aug 15 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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    Lechman, E. R., Jaffurs, D., Ghivizzani, S. C., Gambotto, A., Kovesdi, I., Mi, Z., Evans, C. H., & Robbins, P. D. (1999). Direct adenoviral gene transfer of viral IL-10 to rabbit knees with experimental arthritis ameliorates disease in both injected and contralateral control knees. Journal of Immunology, 163(4), 2202-2208.