Difficulty and discrimination parameters of boston naming test items in a consecutive clinical series

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Boston Naming Test is one of the most widely used neuropsychological instruments; yet, there has been limited use of modern psychometric methods to investigate its properties at the item level. The current study used Item response theory to examine each item's difficulty and discrimination properties, as well as the test's measurement precision across the range of naming ability. Participants included 300 consecutive referrals to the outpatient neuropsychology service at Mayo Clinic in Florida. Results showed that successive items do not necessarily reflect a monotonic increase in psychometric difficulty, some items are inadequate to distinguish individuals at various levels of naming ability, multiple items provide redundant psychometric information, and measurement precision is greatest for persons within a low-average range of ability. These findings may be used to develop short forms, improve reliability in future test versions by replacing psychometrically poor items, and analyze profiles of intra-individual variability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)434-444
Number of pages11
JournalArchives of Clinical Neuropsychology
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

Keywords

  • Boston naming test
  • Item difficulty
  • Item discriminability
  • Item response theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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