Differential Response to Olaparib Treatment Among Men with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Harboring BRCA1 or BRCA2 Versus ATM Mutations

Catherine H. Marshall, Alexandra O. Sokolova, Andrea L. McNatty, Heather H. Cheng, Mario A. Eisenberger, Alan H Bryce, Michael T. Schweizer, Emmanuel S. Antonarakis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, such as olaparib, are being explored as a treatment option for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in men harboring mutations in homologous recombination DNA-repair genes. Whether responses to PARP inhibitors differ according to the affected gene is currently unknown. Objective: To determine whether responses to PARP inhibitors differ between men with BRCA1/2 and those with ATM mutations. Design, setting, and participants: This was a multicenter retrospective review of 23 consecutive men with mCRPC and pathogenic germline and/or somatic BRCA1/2 or ATM mutations treated with olaparib at three academic sites in the USA. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: The proportion of patients achieving a ≥50% decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA 50 response) was compared using Fisher's exact test. Clinical and radiographic progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival were estimated using Kaplan-Meier analyses and compared using the log-rank test. Results and limitations: The study included two men with BRCA1 mutations, 15 with BRCA2 mutations, and six with ATM mutations. PSA 50 responses to olaparib were achieved in 76% (13/17) of men with BRCA1/2 versus 0% (0/6) of men with ATM mutations (Fisher's exact test; p = 0.002). Patients with BRCA1/2 mutations had median PFS of 12.3 mo versus 2.4 mo for those with ATM mutations (hazard ratio 0.17, 95% confidence interval 0.05–0.57; p = 0.004). Limitations include the retrospective design and relatively small sample size. Conclusions: Men with mCRPC harboring ATM mutations experienced inferior outcomes to PARP inhibitor therapy compared to those harboring BRCA1/2 mutations. Alternative therapies should be explored for patients with ATM mutations. Patient summary: Mutations in BRCA1/2 and ATM genes are common in metastatic prostate cancer. In this study we compared outcomes for men with BRCA1/2 mutations to those for men with ATM mutations being treated with olaparib. We found that men with ATM mutations do not respond as well as men with BRCA1/2 mutations. In this retrospective review of 23 patients with BRCA1/2 or ATM mutations treated with olaparib, we found that none of six men with ATM mutations achieved a 50% decline in prostate-specific antigen, compared to 13/17 men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Patients with BRCA1/2 mutations also had longer progression-free survival on olaparib treatment. Men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer harboring ATM mutations may not respond to PARP inhibitors as well as men with BRCA1/2 mutations and may require alternative therapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEuropean urology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Castration
Prostatic Neoplasms
Mutation
Therapeutics
olaparib
Disease-Free Survival
Prostate-Specific Antigen
Complementary Therapies
Genes
Recombinational DNA Repair

Keywords

  • ATM
  • BRCA2
  • Olaparib
  • PARP inhibitor
  • Prostate cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Differential Response to Olaparib Treatment Among Men with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Harboring BRCA1 or BRCA2 Versus ATM Mutations. / Marshall, Catherine H.; Sokolova, Alexandra O.; McNatty, Andrea L.; Cheng, Heather H.; Eisenberger, Mario A.; Bryce, Alan H; Schweizer, Michael T.; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.

In: European urology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marshall, Catherine H. ; Sokolova, Alexandra O. ; McNatty, Andrea L. ; Cheng, Heather H. ; Eisenberger, Mario A. ; Bryce, Alan H ; Schweizer, Michael T. ; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S. / Differential Response to Olaparib Treatment Among Men with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Harboring BRCA1 or BRCA2 Versus ATM Mutations. In: European urology. 2019.
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abstract = "Background: Poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, such as olaparib, are being explored as a treatment option for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in men harboring mutations in homologous recombination DNA-repair genes. Whether responses to PARP inhibitors differ according to the affected gene is currently unknown. Objective: To determine whether responses to PARP inhibitors differ between men with BRCA1/2 and those with ATM mutations. Design, setting, and participants: This was a multicenter retrospective review of 23 consecutive men with mCRPC and pathogenic germline and/or somatic BRCA1/2 or ATM mutations treated with olaparib at three academic sites in the USA. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: The proportion of patients achieving a ≥50{\%} decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA 50 response) was compared using Fisher's exact test. Clinical and radiographic progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival were estimated using Kaplan-Meier analyses and compared using the log-rank test. Results and limitations: The study included two men with BRCA1 mutations, 15 with BRCA2 mutations, and six with ATM mutations. PSA 50 responses to olaparib were achieved in 76{\%} (13/17) of men with BRCA1/2 versus 0{\%} (0/6) of men with ATM mutations (Fisher's exact test; p = 0.002). Patients with BRCA1/2 mutations had median PFS of 12.3 mo versus 2.4 mo for those with ATM mutations (hazard ratio 0.17, 95{\%} confidence interval 0.05–0.57; p = 0.004). Limitations include the retrospective design and relatively small sample size. Conclusions: Men with mCRPC harboring ATM mutations experienced inferior outcomes to PARP inhibitor therapy compared to those harboring BRCA1/2 mutations. Alternative therapies should be explored for patients with ATM mutations. Patient summary: Mutations in BRCA1/2 and ATM genes are common in metastatic prostate cancer. In this study we compared outcomes for men with BRCA1/2 mutations to those for men with ATM mutations being treated with olaparib. We found that men with ATM mutations do not respond as well as men with BRCA1/2 mutations. In this retrospective review of 23 patients with BRCA1/2 or ATM mutations treated with olaparib, we found that none of six men with ATM mutations achieved a 50{\%} decline in prostate-specific antigen, compared to 13/17 men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Patients with BRCA1/2 mutations also had longer progression-free survival on olaparib treatment. Men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer harboring ATM mutations may not respond to PARP inhibitors as well as men with BRCA1/2 mutations and may require alternative therapies.",
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author = "Marshall, {Catherine H.} and Sokolova, {Alexandra O.} and McNatty, {Andrea L.} and Cheng, {Heather H.} and Eisenberger, {Mario A.} and Bryce, {Alan H} and Schweizer, {Michael T.} and Antonarakis, {Emmanuel S.}",
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language = "English (US)",
journal = "European Urology",
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T1 - Differential Response to Olaparib Treatment Among Men with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Harboring BRCA1 or BRCA2 Versus ATM Mutations

AU - Marshall, Catherine H.

AU - Sokolova, Alexandra O.

AU - McNatty, Andrea L.

AU - Cheng, Heather H.

AU - Eisenberger, Mario A.

AU - Bryce, Alan H

AU - Schweizer, Michael T.

AU - Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background: Poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, such as olaparib, are being explored as a treatment option for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in men harboring mutations in homologous recombination DNA-repair genes. Whether responses to PARP inhibitors differ according to the affected gene is currently unknown. Objective: To determine whether responses to PARP inhibitors differ between men with BRCA1/2 and those with ATM mutations. Design, setting, and participants: This was a multicenter retrospective review of 23 consecutive men with mCRPC and pathogenic germline and/or somatic BRCA1/2 or ATM mutations treated with olaparib at three academic sites in the USA. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: The proportion of patients achieving a ≥50% decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA 50 response) was compared using Fisher's exact test. Clinical and radiographic progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival were estimated using Kaplan-Meier analyses and compared using the log-rank test. Results and limitations: The study included two men with BRCA1 mutations, 15 with BRCA2 mutations, and six with ATM mutations. PSA 50 responses to olaparib were achieved in 76% (13/17) of men with BRCA1/2 versus 0% (0/6) of men with ATM mutations (Fisher's exact test; p = 0.002). Patients with BRCA1/2 mutations had median PFS of 12.3 mo versus 2.4 mo for those with ATM mutations (hazard ratio 0.17, 95% confidence interval 0.05–0.57; p = 0.004). Limitations include the retrospective design and relatively small sample size. Conclusions: Men with mCRPC harboring ATM mutations experienced inferior outcomes to PARP inhibitor therapy compared to those harboring BRCA1/2 mutations. Alternative therapies should be explored for patients with ATM mutations. Patient summary: Mutations in BRCA1/2 and ATM genes are common in metastatic prostate cancer. In this study we compared outcomes for men with BRCA1/2 mutations to those for men with ATM mutations being treated with olaparib. We found that men with ATM mutations do not respond as well as men with BRCA1/2 mutations. In this retrospective review of 23 patients with BRCA1/2 or ATM mutations treated with olaparib, we found that none of six men with ATM mutations achieved a 50% decline in prostate-specific antigen, compared to 13/17 men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Patients with BRCA1/2 mutations also had longer progression-free survival on olaparib treatment. Men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer harboring ATM mutations may not respond to PARP inhibitors as well as men with BRCA1/2 mutations and may require alternative therapies.

AB - Background: Poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, such as olaparib, are being explored as a treatment option for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in men harboring mutations in homologous recombination DNA-repair genes. Whether responses to PARP inhibitors differ according to the affected gene is currently unknown. Objective: To determine whether responses to PARP inhibitors differ between men with BRCA1/2 and those with ATM mutations. Design, setting, and participants: This was a multicenter retrospective review of 23 consecutive men with mCRPC and pathogenic germline and/or somatic BRCA1/2 or ATM mutations treated with olaparib at three academic sites in the USA. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: The proportion of patients achieving a ≥50% decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA 50 response) was compared using Fisher's exact test. Clinical and radiographic progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival were estimated using Kaplan-Meier analyses and compared using the log-rank test. Results and limitations: The study included two men with BRCA1 mutations, 15 with BRCA2 mutations, and six with ATM mutations. PSA 50 responses to olaparib were achieved in 76% (13/17) of men with BRCA1/2 versus 0% (0/6) of men with ATM mutations (Fisher's exact test; p = 0.002). Patients with BRCA1/2 mutations had median PFS of 12.3 mo versus 2.4 mo for those with ATM mutations (hazard ratio 0.17, 95% confidence interval 0.05–0.57; p = 0.004). Limitations include the retrospective design and relatively small sample size. Conclusions: Men with mCRPC harboring ATM mutations experienced inferior outcomes to PARP inhibitor therapy compared to those harboring BRCA1/2 mutations. Alternative therapies should be explored for patients with ATM mutations. Patient summary: Mutations in BRCA1/2 and ATM genes are common in metastatic prostate cancer. In this study we compared outcomes for men with BRCA1/2 mutations to those for men with ATM mutations being treated with olaparib. We found that men with ATM mutations do not respond as well as men with BRCA1/2 mutations. In this retrospective review of 23 patients with BRCA1/2 or ATM mutations treated with olaparib, we found that none of six men with ATM mutations achieved a 50% decline in prostate-specific antigen, compared to 13/17 men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Patients with BRCA1/2 mutations also had longer progression-free survival on olaparib treatment. Men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer harboring ATM mutations may not respond to PARP inhibitors as well as men with BRCA1/2 mutations and may require alternative therapies.

KW - ATM

KW - BRCA2

KW - Olaparib

KW - PARP inhibitor

KW - Prostate cancer

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