Differences in the angiographic evaluation of coiled cerebral aneurysms between a core laboratory reader and operators: Results of the cerecyte coil trial

Issa Rezek, R. K. Lingineni, M. Sneade, A. J. Molyneux, A. J. Fox, D. F. Kallmes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Independent evaluation of angiographic images is becoming widely applied in the assessment of treatment outcomes of cerebral aneurysms. In the current study, we assessed the agreement between an independent core laboratory and the operators regarding angiographic appearance in a recent randomized, controlled trial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were derived from the Cerecyte Coil Trial. Angiographic images of each coiled aneurysm, taken immediately after embolization and at 5- to 7-month follow-up, were evaluated by the operator at the treating center and by an independent neuroradiologist at the core laboratory. For the purpose of this study, images were interpreted on a 3-point scale to provide uniformity for analysis; grade 1: complete occlusion, grade 2: neck remnant; and grade 3: sac filling. "Unfavorable angiographic appearance" was defined as grade 3 at follow-up or interval worsening of grade between the 2 time points. RESULTS: The study included 434 aneurysms. Immediately after embolization, grade 3 was reported by operators in 39 (9%) compared with 52 (12%) by the core laboratory (P = .159). On follow-up, grade 3 was reported by operators in 44 (10%) compared with 81 (19%) by the core laboratory (P < .0001). Overall, operators noted unfavorable angiographic appearance in 78 (18%) compared with 134 (31%) by the core laboratory (P < .0001). At every time point, agreement between the core laboratory and the operators was slight. CONCLUSIONS: Unfavorable angiographic appearance was noted almost twice as frequently by an independent core laboratory as compared with the operators. Planning of trials and interpretation of published studies should be done with careful attention to the mode of angiographic appearance interpretation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)124-127
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology

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