Differences in fibertract profiles between patients with migraine and those with persistent post-traumatic headache

Catherine D. Chong, Jacob Peplinski, Visar Berisha, Katherine Ross, Todd J Schwedt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Often, persistent post-traumatic headache and migraine are phenotypically similar. However, the similarities and differences in the neuropathological underpinnings of persistent post-traumatic headache and migraine require further understanding. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and a novel method for detecting subtle changes in fibertract integrity by measuring node-by-node parameters along each tract to compare fibertract profiles between those with migraine and those with persistent post-traumatic headache, and compared both cohorts to a group of controls. Methods: Eighteen fibertracts were reconstructed for 131 subjects, including 49 patients with persistent post-traumatic headache attributed to mild traumatic brain injury, 41 with migraine, and 41 controls. Node-by-node diffusion parameters of mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity were calculated along each tract. Mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity measurements were averaged along quartiles of each tract for statistical interpretation and group comparison. Using a post-hoc analysis, correlations between tract quartile measurements and headache frequency were calculated. Results: There were significant differences between migraine and persistent post-traumatic headache cohorts for quartile measurements of mean diffusivity or radial diffusivity in the bilateral anterior thalamic radiations, cingulum (angular bundles and cingulate gyri), inferior longitudinal fasciculi, and uncinate fasciculi, the left corticospinal tract, and the right superior longitudinal fasciculi-parietal portion. For migraine patients, there was a significant positive correlation between headache frequency and forceps major mean diffusivity, whereas for persistent post-traumatic headache there was a positive correlation between headache frequency and cingulum angular bundle mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity. Conclusions: Quartile measurements of radial diffusivity and mean diffusivity indicate unique differences in fibertract profiles between those with migraine vs. persistent post-traumatic headache. Although for both migraine and persistent post-traumatic headache there was a positive relationship between fibertract alterations and headache frequency, there were disease-specific differences between headache frequency and fibertract injury patterns. These findings might suggest potential differences in the neuropathological mechanisms underlying migraine and persistent post-traumatic headache.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCephalalgia
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Post-Traumatic Headache
Migraine Disorders
Headache
Brain Concussion
Parietal Lobe
Pyramidal Tracts
Diffusion Tensor Imaging
Gyrus Cinguli
Surgical Instruments
Radiation

Keywords

  • concussion
  • diffusion tensor imaging
  • fibertracts
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • migraine
  • mild traumatic brain injury
  • Persistent post-traumatic headache
  • white matter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Differences in fibertract profiles between patients with migraine and those with persistent post-traumatic headache. / Chong, Catherine D.; Peplinski, Jacob; Berisha, Visar; Ross, Katherine; Schwedt, Todd J.

In: Cephalalgia, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objectives: Often, persistent post-traumatic headache and migraine are phenotypically similar. However, the similarities and differences in the neuropathological underpinnings of persistent post-traumatic headache and migraine require further understanding. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and a novel method for detecting subtle changes in fibertract integrity by measuring node-by-node parameters along each tract to compare fibertract profiles between those with migraine and those with persistent post-traumatic headache, and compared both cohorts to a group of controls. Methods: Eighteen fibertracts were reconstructed for 131 subjects, including 49 patients with persistent post-traumatic headache attributed to mild traumatic brain injury, 41 with migraine, and 41 controls. Node-by-node diffusion parameters of mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity were calculated along each tract. Mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity measurements were averaged along quartiles of each tract for statistical interpretation and group comparison. Using a post-hoc analysis, correlations between tract quartile measurements and headache frequency were calculated. Results: There were significant differences between migraine and persistent post-traumatic headache cohorts for quartile measurements of mean diffusivity or radial diffusivity in the bilateral anterior thalamic radiations, cingulum (angular bundles and cingulate gyri), inferior longitudinal fasciculi, and uncinate fasciculi, the left corticospinal tract, and the right superior longitudinal fasciculi-parietal portion. For migraine patients, there was a significant positive correlation between headache frequency and forceps major mean diffusivity, whereas for persistent post-traumatic headache there was a positive correlation between headache frequency and cingulum angular bundle mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity. Conclusions: Quartile measurements of radial diffusivity and mean diffusivity indicate unique differences in fibertract profiles between those with migraine vs. persistent post-traumatic headache. Although for both migraine and persistent post-traumatic headache there was a positive relationship between fibertract alterations and headache frequency, there were disease-specific differences between headache frequency and fibertract injury patterns. These findings might suggest potential differences in the neuropathological mechanisms underlying migraine and persistent post-traumatic headache.",
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N2 - Objectives: Often, persistent post-traumatic headache and migraine are phenotypically similar. However, the similarities and differences in the neuropathological underpinnings of persistent post-traumatic headache and migraine require further understanding. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and a novel method for detecting subtle changes in fibertract integrity by measuring node-by-node parameters along each tract to compare fibertract profiles between those with migraine and those with persistent post-traumatic headache, and compared both cohorts to a group of controls. Methods: Eighteen fibertracts were reconstructed for 131 subjects, including 49 patients with persistent post-traumatic headache attributed to mild traumatic brain injury, 41 with migraine, and 41 controls. Node-by-node diffusion parameters of mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity were calculated along each tract. Mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity measurements were averaged along quartiles of each tract for statistical interpretation and group comparison. Using a post-hoc analysis, correlations between tract quartile measurements and headache frequency were calculated. Results: There were significant differences between migraine and persistent post-traumatic headache cohorts for quartile measurements of mean diffusivity or radial diffusivity in the bilateral anterior thalamic radiations, cingulum (angular bundles and cingulate gyri), inferior longitudinal fasciculi, and uncinate fasciculi, the left corticospinal tract, and the right superior longitudinal fasciculi-parietal portion. For migraine patients, there was a significant positive correlation between headache frequency and forceps major mean diffusivity, whereas for persistent post-traumatic headache there was a positive correlation between headache frequency and cingulum angular bundle mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity. Conclusions: Quartile measurements of radial diffusivity and mean diffusivity indicate unique differences in fibertract profiles between those with migraine vs. persistent post-traumatic headache. Although for both migraine and persistent post-traumatic headache there was a positive relationship between fibertract alterations and headache frequency, there were disease-specific differences between headache frequency and fibertract injury patterns. These findings might suggest potential differences in the neuropathological mechanisms underlying migraine and persistent post-traumatic headache.

AB - Objectives: Often, persistent post-traumatic headache and migraine are phenotypically similar. However, the similarities and differences in the neuropathological underpinnings of persistent post-traumatic headache and migraine require further understanding. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and a novel method for detecting subtle changes in fibertract integrity by measuring node-by-node parameters along each tract to compare fibertract profiles between those with migraine and those with persistent post-traumatic headache, and compared both cohorts to a group of controls. Methods: Eighteen fibertracts were reconstructed for 131 subjects, including 49 patients with persistent post-traumatic headache attributed to mild traumatic brain injury, 41 with migraine, and 41 controls. Node-by-node diffusion parameters of mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity were calculated along each tract. Mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity measurements were averaged along quartiles of each tract for statistical interpretation and group comparison. Using a post-hoc analysis, correlations between tract quartile measurements and headache frequency were calculated. Results: There were significant differences between migraine and persistent post-traumatic headache cohorts for quartile measurements of mean diffusivity or radial diffusivity in the bilateral anterior thalamic radiations, cingulum (angular bundles and cingulate gyri), inferior longitudinal fasciculi, and uncinate fasciculi, the left corticospinal tract, and the right superior longitudinal fasciculi-parietal portion. For migraine patients, there was a significant positive correlation between headache frequency and forceps major mean diffusivity, whereas for persistent post-traumatic headache there was a positive correlation between headache frequency and cingulum angular bundle mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity. Conclusions: Quartile measurements of radial diffusivity and mean diffusivity indicate unique differences in fibertract profiles between those with migraine vs. persistent post-traumatic headache. Although for both migraine and persistent post-traumatic headache there was a positive relationship between fibertract alterations and headache frequency, there were disease-specific differences between headache frequency and fibertract injury patterns. These findings might suggest potential differences in the neuropathological mechanisms underlying migraine and persistent post-traumatic headache.

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KW - magnetic resonance imaging

KW - migraine

KW - mild traumatic brain injury

KW - Persistent post-traumatic headache

KW - white matter

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