Differences in Clinical Features of Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein Antibody-Associated Optic Neuritis in White and Asian Race

Tanyatuth Padungkiatsagul, John J. Chen, Panitha Jindahra, Tetsuya Akaishi, Toshiyuki Takahashi, Ichiro Nakashima, Takayuki Takeshita, Heather E. Moss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To determine whether clinical features and visual outcomes of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody−associated optic neuritis (MOG-ON) differ between White and Asian subjects. Design: Multicenter retrospective cohort. Methods: This was a multicenter study of 153 subjects who were White or Asian with a history of adult-onset (age 18 years or older) optic neuritis (ON) and positive MOG-IgG serology by cell-based assay. Subjects were enrolled from 2 unpublished cohorts (January 2017-November 2019) and 9 published cohorts with case-level data available (2012-2018). Subjects with alternative etiologies of demyelinating disease and positive or lack of aquaporin-4−IgG serology result were excluded. The main outcome measurements were clinical features and final visual outcomes. Results: Of the 153 subjects who were White (n = 80) or Asian (n = 73) included in the study, 93 (61%) were women, mean age of onset was 40.8 ± 14.9 years, and median follow-up was 35.2 months (range: 1-432 months); all of these characteristics were similar between White and Asian subjects. White subjects were more likely to have recurrent ON (57 [71%] vs 20 [27%]; P =.001) and extra-optic nerve manifestations (35 [44%] vs 8 [11%]; P =.001). Optic disc swelling, neuroimaging findings, presenting visual acuity (VA), treatment, and final VA did not differ according to subjects' race. Despite the high prevalence of severe visual loss (<20/200) during nadir, most subjects had good recovery of VA (>20/40) at final examination (51/77 [66%] White subjects vs 52/70 [74%] Asian subjects). Conclusion: White subjects with MOG-ON were more likely to have recurrent disease and extra-optic nerve manifestations. Visual outcomes were similar between White and Asian subjects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)332-340
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican journal of ophthalmology
Volume219
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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