Differences among Black and White young adults on prior attempts and motivation to help a smoker quit

Christi A. Patten, Tabetha A. Brockman, Steven C. Ames, Jon O. Ebbert, Susanna R. Stevens, Janet L. Thomas, Chudley E. Werch, Gebre Egziabher Kiros, Josephine M. Kershaw, Joan M. Carlson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study assessed differences between Black and White young adults on prior attempts and motivation to help a smoker quit. A total of 1,621 undergraduates (912 Black, 709 White; 63% female) ages 18-24 years completed a cross-sectional survey. Overall, 54% reported they had previously tried to help someone else stop smoking (52% among Blacks vs. 58% among Whites, p = 0.016). Among nonsmokers who indicated they were close to a smoker whom they thought should quit, Blacks were most often concerned about a family member whereas Whites endorsed concern most often for a friend (p < 0.001). Blacks were more likely than Whites to indicate interest in learning ways to help this smoker to quit (p < 0.001) but there was no significant differences on motivation level (46% of Blacks and 42% of Whites reported they were "very" or "extremely" motivated to help this person quit). After adjusting for gender, the results remained unchanged. Tobacco control efforts could focus on optimizing these supportive behaviors as well as expressed motivation and interest in helping a smoker to quit among young adult nonsmokers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)496-502
Number of pages7
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008

Keywords

  • Racial differences
  • Smoking
  • Smoking cessation
  • Social support
  • Tobacco cessation
  • Tobacco control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Differences among Black and White young adults on prior attempts and motivation to help a smoker quit'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Patten, C. A., Brockman, T. A., Ames, S. C., Ebbert, J. O., Stevens, S. R., Thomas, J. L., Werch, C. E., Kiros, G. E., Kershaw, J. M., & Carlson, J. M. (2008). Differences among Black and White young adults on prior attempts and motivation to help a smoker quit. Addictive Behaviors, 33(3), 496-502. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2007.10.007