Dietary salt intake and time to relapse in paediatric multiple sclerosis

The Network of Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Centers, Moses Rodriguez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Salt intake was reported to be associated with increased clinical and MRI activity in adult patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). Objective To determine if salt intake is associated with time to relapse in patients with paediatric-onset MS. Methods Paediatric-onset MS and patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) within 4 years of disease onset were recruited from 15 paediatric MS centres in the USA as part of a case-control study. Patients with available prospective relapse data subsequent to enrolment were included in this project. Dietary sodium intake was assessed by self-report questionnaire using the validated Block Kids Food Screener. Cox proportional-hazards regression models were employed to determine the association of sodium density, excess sodium intake and sodium density tertiles with time to relapse following study enrolment, adjusting for several confounders. Results 174 relapsing-remitting MS/CIS patients were included in this analysis (mean age of 15.0 years, and 64.9% females). Median duration of follow-up was 1.8 years. In an unadjusted analysis, density of daily sodium intake was not associated with time to relapse, and patients with excess sodium intake had no decrease in time to relapse as compared with patients with nonexcess sodium intake. The multivariable analysis demonstrated that patients in the medium and high tertile of sodium density had a HR of 0.69 (95% CI 0.37 to 1.30, p=0.25) and 1.37 (95% CI 0.74 to 2.51, p=0.32) compared with patients in the lowest tertile, respectively. Conclusions Higher salt intake was not associated with decreased time to relapse in patients with paediatric-onset MS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 24 2016

Fingerprint

Multiple Sclerosis
Salts
Pediatrics
Recurrence
Sodium
Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis
Salt
Relapse
Intake
Dietary Sodium
Proportional Hazards Models
Self Report
Case-Control Studies
Food
Onset

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Dietary salt intake and time to relapse in paediatric multiple sclerosis. / The Network of Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Centers; Rodriguez, Moses.

In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 24.06.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

The Network of Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Centers ; Rodriguez, Moses. / Dietary salt intake and time to relapse in paediatric multiple sclerosis. In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry. 2016.
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title = "Dietary salt intake and time to relapse in paediatric multiple sclerosis",
abstract = "Background Salt intake was reported to be associated with increased clinical and MRI activity in adult patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). Objective To determine if salt intake is associated with time to relapse in patients with paediatric-onset MS. Methods Paediatric-onset MS and patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) within 4 years of disease onset were recruited from 15 paediatric MS centres in the USA as part of a case-control study. Patients with available prospective relapse data subsequent to enrolment were included in this project. Dietary sodium intake was assessed by self-report questionnaire using the validated Block Kids Food Screener. Cox proportional-hazards regression models were employed to determine the association of sodium density, excess sodium intake and sodium density tertiles with time to relapse following study enrolment, adjusting for several confounders. Results 174 relapsing-remitting MS/CIS patients were included in this analysis (mean age of 15.0 years, and 64.9{\%} females). Median duration of follow-up was 1.8 years. In an unadjusted analysis, density of daily sodium intake was not associated with time to relapse, and patients with excess sodium intake had no decrease in time to relapse as compared with patients with nonexcess sodium intake. The multivariable analysis demonstrated that patients in the medium and high tertile of sodium density had a HR of 0.69 (95{\%} CI 0.37 to 1.30, p=0.25) and 1.37 (95{\%} CI 0.74 to 2.51, p=0.32) compared with patients in the lowest tertile, respectively. Conclusions Higher salt intake was not associated with decreased time to relapse in patients with paediatric-onset MS.",
author = "{The Network of Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Centers} and Bardia Nourbakhsh and Jennifer Graves and Casper, {T. Charles} and Sabeen Lulu and Amy Waldman and Anita Belman and Benjamin Greenberg and Bianca Weinstock-Guttman and Gregory Aaen and Jan-Mendelt Tillema and Janace Hart and Jayne Ness and Jennifer Rubin and Lauren Krupp and Mark Gorman and Moses Rodriguez and Moses Rodriguez and Tanuja Chitnis and John Rose and Lisa Barcellos and Emmanuelle Waubant",
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T1 - Dietary salt intake and time to relapse in paediatric multiple sclerosis

AU - The Network of Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Centers

AU - Nourbakhsh, Bardia

AU - Graves, Jennifer

AU - Casper, T. Charles

AU - Lulu, Sabeen

AU - Waldman, Amy

AU - Belman, Anita

AU - Greenberg, Benjamin

AU - Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

AU - Aaen, Gregory

AU - Tillema, Jan-Mendelt

AU - Hart, Janace

AU - Ness, Jayne

AU - Rubin, Jennifer

AU - Krupp, Lauren

AU - Gorman, Mark

AU - Rodriguez, Moses

AU - Rodriguez, Moses

AU - Chitnis, Tanuja

AU - Rose, John

AU - Barcellos, Lisa

AU - Waubant, Emmanuelle

PY - 2016/6/24

Y1 - 2016/6/24

N2 - Background Salt intake was reported to be associated with increased clinical and MRI activity in adult patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). Objective To determine if salt intake is associated with time to relapse in patients with paediatric-onset MS. Methods Paediatric-onset MS and patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) within 4 years of disease onset were recruited from 15 paediatric MS centres in the USA as part of a case-control study. Patients with available prospective relapse data subsequent to enrolment were included in this project. Dietary sodium intake was assessed by self-report questionnaire using the validated Block Kids Food Screener. Cox proportional-hazards regression models were employed to determine the association of sodium density, excess sodium intake and sodium density tertiles with time to relapse following study enrolment, adjusting for several confounders. Results 174 relapsing-remitting MS/CIS patients were included in this analysis (mean age of 15.0 years, and 64.9% females). Median duration of follow-up was 1.8 years. In an unadjusted analysis, density of daily sodium intake was not associated with time to relapse, and patients with excess sodium intake had no decrease in time to relapse as compared with patients with nonexcess sodium intake. The multivariable analysis demonstrated that patients in the medium and high tertile of sodium density had a HR of 0.69 (95% CI 0.37 to 1.30, p=0.25) and 1.37 (95% CI 0.74 to 2.51, p=0.32) compared with patients in the lowest tertile, respectively. Conclusions Higher salt intake was not associated with decreased time to relapse in patients with paediatric-onset MS.

AB - Background Salt intake was reported to be associated with increased clinical and MRI activity in adult patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). Objective To determine if salt intake is associated with time to relapse in patients with paediatric-onset MS. Methods Paediatric-onset MS and patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) within 4 years of disease onset were recruited from 15 paediatric MS centres in the USA as part of a case-control study. Patients with available prospective relapse data subsequent to enrolment were included in this project. Dietary sodium intake was assessed by self-report questionnaire using the validated Block Kids Food Screener. Cox proportional-hazards regression models were employed to determine the association of sodium density, excess sodium intake and sodium density tertiles with time to relapse following study enrolment, adjusting for several confounders. Results 174 relapsing-remitting MS/CIS patients were included in this analysis (mean age of 15.0 years, and 64.9% females). Median duration of follow-up was 1.8 years. In an unadjusted analysis, density of daily sodium intake was not associated with time to relapse, and patients with excess sodium intake had no decrease in time to relapse as compared with patients with nonexcess sodium intake. The multivariable analysis demonstrated that patients in the medium and high tertile of sodium density had a HR of 0.69 (95% CI 0.37 to 1.30, p=0.25) and 1.37 (95% CI 0.74 to 2.51, p=0.32) compared with patients in the lowest tertile, respectively. Conclusions Higher salt intake was not associated with decreased time to relapse in patients with paediatric-onset MS.

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U2 - 10.1136/jnnp-2016-313410

DO - 10.1136/jnnp-2016-313410

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JO - Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry

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